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Thread: Sun Loving Coleus...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    9,934

    Sun Loving Coleus...

    Coleus 'Solar Shadow'

    This is my absolute favorite.... It grows fast, branches out well and looks like a well rounded, yet full shrub.

    This is one plant, but it has been pruned fairly often. Each time that I have pruned, I started cuttings in water, then a couple of weeks later transfered those to pots. After that, I made cuttings from the cuttings...

    It's a fun and beautiful plant and currently measures about 43" tall and 50" wide.



    Here's a closeup of the leaves....



    I have enough potted cuttings and others started in my gardens that I am letting this one go to seed. The bumble bees love it!

    Enjoy!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
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    More Favorites

    More that seem to like lots of sun!







    Nice, huh?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western Michigan near Muskegon
    Posts
    1,462

    Pretty

    Ann,
    I was disappointed to not be able to get any of these. The local greenhouse, said they sold out way early. Just my luck. ...

    Maybe next year! They are really pretty.
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Vicki,

    They are in high demand, but there are some varieties available this year. The first one in this thread is not on the market yet...

    After some research, I found out that one of the reasons (besides heat) that they are known as sun loving coleus is that they produce very few seeds.

    Most coleus here will bolt to seed in no time (especially here), and you have to keep pinching them or they will decline in health after putting their energy into seed. This is typical of a true annual as opposed to a tropical type perennial.

    Annuals are simply short lived. Nature intended them to be that way.

    They are still hard to find, but should become more and more available. The trick is that they have to be overwintered in a warm enough environment. They simply do not take the cold very well.

    At Bellingrath Gardens, these will become 'border' plants afer the azaleas finish their month of glory. The azaleas will be pruned (tidied up a bit), then border plants placed on the outer edges of these enormous shrubs.

    This is my first time to be able to go to Bellingrath during peak azalea time. Both Hunter and I enjoyed it.

    I am looking forward to going back in the summer. Strange as it may seem, there are actually 3 seasons for annuals here. It's a huge market.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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