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Thread: House Moving

  1. #16
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    Aug 2001
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    Tex .. near Dallas
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    How tall ... hmmm?

    How tall .......... well ..... don't remember ......... but think there was one bed that was taller than the others ... but could be wrong ...

    got to try and make contact with the folks ... still not sure what I could do with all of them but got friends .... and can't ever remember them turning down anything free.

    Jim

  2. #17
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    Jim,

    If you do end up getting the iris, remember your on-line friends too! I'd happily reimburse you postage for a few of them!

    Rebecca



  3. #18
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    Question Friends?

    friends? Uh huh .... sure .. now when we looking at a 100+ Iris we be friends.

    Just kidding ..... but like my Grandpappy always said, "Son, I just want a fair advantage" put ur trading coat on Becca .. I will play fair ... most of the time....Ann can moderate again.

    I would think that if I manage to get them .. I will have more than enough to go around. No telling what colors unless someone remembers what was planted.

    Ok .. work time.

    Jim

  4. #19
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    All of you have fun, and I will read and LAS!

    Jim,

    The reason I asked how tall the irises are is because you need to consider air flow around you roses. I was just thinking that you may not want to enclose your roses with the tall ones.

    Does that make sense? What do you think?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #20
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    Aug 2001
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    Tex .. near Dallas
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    Iris and Roses

    Ann,

    Haven't ever grown the Iris .. so I really didn't know that there were height differences. Same thing happened on the daylilies ....... and I will have to move several this year because they are much taller than the plants behind them. We are learning and just move them as needed.

    Really not sure where I would put the Iris .. they are around trees where they are. I have 3 treees that I could put them around but would need to raise the level .... and I don't know how high I could raise the level before I woiuld hurt the trees. Is there a "general rule" for this?

    If I get the Iris ... will have questions on handling and storage for sure ... but one thing at a time.

    Ann, haven't heard from Rebecca since I offered to "trade" with her ... and only maintain a "slight" advantage ... u think she be a "shy" girl?

    Jim

  6. #21
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    Who Me? Shy?


    Jim,
    No, not shy, just had to go back to work after my little mini-vacation and haven't been on-line. That and I just got notification that there was a reply today!

    Trade, huh. . . . you haven't got them yet! Can't trade what you ain't got ol boy! However, I'm sure we could work something out I do have 29+ daylily seedlings that are in scape and I won't be keeping all of them, plus I have tons of Stella D'Oro, Siloam June Bug and a few others I can always dig, fresh, just for you! I have all those from the yard sale that didn't (sell) sell as well. Unless you saw an iris of mine you liked! I do have another planting of the 'Horned Tellow' that needs to be moved.

    So, as my Grandpappy used to say. . . .'Put up or shut up!"

    I now have seven albums at HyperPhoto, even one on Iris, although I didn't get good photos of all the ones I have, so only a few are represented.

    My Photo Albums

    It is password protected (pippin)

    I'll check for your response after work tonight!

    Rebecca


  7. #22

    OK, I HAVE to jump in here!

    See how you all are? I miss a day or so of messages and you go and do something exciting and I miss out on all the fun!!!..lol.
    Let's see, where to start...
    I have "rescued" so many flowers in my life, it is not funny..
    But unfortunately, I have not been as proper about my methods as you all have..tee hee. I kinda see myself as a "plant activist"?
    If I see a plant somewhere on an abandoned property, that is in dire need of my help, I don't think about it, I don't make any calls, I just take it..lol. NO ONE has ever stopped me or even asked me what I was doing, but if they HAD, I am sure I could have come up with a Good Samaritan Plant story to give them..tee hee. I take them home and coddle them back to health or "adopt" them out to another loving gardener like myself.
    If the "abandonment" part is in question, such as your case, Jim, I know if it had been ME, I would have just rescued them anyway and thought about the consequences later.. I tend to be very IMPULSIVE when it comes to "opportunty" versus the right thang to do regarding a poor little flower..tee hee. But that is just ME.
    Hey, I can fess up to my fellow gardeners, but I don't think anyone else would quite understand..lol.
    As far as transplanting them, as has been said before, it can be done at any time of year, but it WILL interrupt their bloom time this year if they have not bloomed yet. And since that is the case, what I do is to cut the leaves back to about 4-6", so the plant can focus it's energy on root development and settling in. IF you ARE going to transplant right away, trim back the leaves, separate them (cutting or removing any damaged or mushy sections) and just through them in a bucket of water til you get to it and leave in a shaded area. If you need to dry them and store until you find a good home for them, trim the leaves as mentioned, trim the roots as well a BIT, wash all soil off them and spray with a fungicide and let dry. Throw them in a brown paper bag after dry and they will be fine for a few months, believe me.
    As Tom mentioned though, when you do plant them, you have to make sure that half of the rhizome is ABOVE the ground. What I do is dig up a round "O" in the soil (with the inner part of the O undisturbed), lay the rhizome horizontally in the center of the "O" , spread out the roots around the outer part of the O and cover with soil, tamp down and gently water. Remember that THAT rhizome will have babies within a year or so, so give them plenty of room unless you want to have to redivide them in a few years. Irises tend to quit blooming when they get all crowded. Sounds like that bed was in dire need of dividing anyway! You will probably see lots of places where the rhizomes have actually started growing on TOP of other rhizomes! Poor Babies!!
    Now you get out there Jim and do your duty and make us all proud!
    (AND send ME a few while you are at it.. hee hee

    Becki
    Self Appointed President of the
    Save the Flowers Foundation
    That's my story and I'm sticking to it..
    Becki B.
    Central Ohio
    Zone 5b-6

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Tex .. near Dallas
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    Cool Put Up or Shut Up?????

    3rd time to try this ........ had storms come through .. lost electricty on and off for several hours and then off for 6 hrs ... not fun.

    So ... Ur Grandpappy was a man of few words huh? That is ok .. like his style .. must have some Texas roots.

    Called today and got the new owners to be ... have permission to remove anything I want after they close ... late July or August. However, they suggested that I talk to the owner and see if I can go ahead and start removing things now. I plan to do that tomorrow if possible. Still can't trade what I don't have but getting closer to ownership. Also noticed a lot of Turks Cap .. small bushes but blooming.

    Working on raised rose bed .. if I can't find out what color Iris is where ...... may just plant all Iris in the bed long enough for them to bloom and keep what I want and give away the rest. Not really interested in Trading ... if I can't use it ........ will give it away. Been given too much to get picky now.

    Read Becki's instruction on what to do with them ... appreciate it ... will be working in the dark .. haven't done it before.

    Ok .. late here .... just didn't want Rebecca's grandpappy to think I couldn't "put up" when push came to shove.

    Jim

  9. #24
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    All Green Thumbs mentioned planting so some of the rhizome is at the surface. I just planted 2, as I mentioned in an earlier post, and treated them like daylilies. Should I dig them up and get that rhizome/tuber closer to the surface ???
    Also, guess what I put in the car this morning before leaving for work ? A trowel, a large plastic pot and a big shovel(had to put in back of car- wouldn't fit in trunk). And guess who helped me ? My husband ! Mr. 'Oh I don't really think you should be doing that'. He was so busy talking about something else that I don't think he realized what he was doing(aiding and abetting a plant russler).
    On the way home yesterday, I thought I saw an asiatic lily on property where the house was moved years ago. Maybe I was just seeing things, but I'll know for sure on the way home tonight.

  10. #25
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    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Yes, Above...

    Cathy,

    Yes, you do need to dig them up and replant. I think both Tom and Becki mentioned this. This is very important because if you plant them deeper than that, they will most likely become diseased and rot.

    Sounds like you are having FUN!

    Jim,

    When you dig them up from the lot where the house is being moved, cut off the upper part of the leaves leaving only an inch or two of the green nearest the rhizome. That will keep them from transpiring too much. This is also helpful when dividing lilies, especially in our heat!

    If you plan to plant them in the next month or two, put them in a dark plastic bag, like a Walmart bag with just a little soil in the bottom. Don't close the bag, but keep it in a shady place with good ventilation and keep that soil just barely moist.

    You could also probably let them dry out more, and store them in a very dark, ventilated place in old mesh bags, but that may not be necessary if you are going to be planting them soon.

    In any event, check them often to make sure there is no mold or fungus growing on them. That would cause you problems in the end.

    There is a Bulb Dust that you should be able to find at your local retail garden centers. It is usually not that expensive. You may want to check that out since I think you mentioned a lot of rain. Just Read the Label and follow directions, okay?

    Good Luck and Have FUN!

    P.S. On the way home from the store today, I saw the American Beauty Bush that I got the cuttings from a couple of years ago. It has no protection from winter's cold winds and is in full sun, and I was amazed that it is so small. So, I think that Tom is 'right on' that the dappled shade of my neighbor's nearby pine tree is just right for my Callicarpa Americana! I suspect the pine tree is providing winter protection and making it deciduous rather than herbaceous.

    Thanks, Tom!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  11. #26

    Plant Russler?

    Cathy,
    So glad to see that I am not the only one who keeps a trowel and bucket in the trunk of my car for "Plant Emergencies"..lol.
    Started doing that years ago when it seemed like I was missing too many golden oppportunities. Actually, MY emergency kit consists of a box of plastic baggies, a roll of paper towels, a plastic jug of water, a trowel, a steak knife, pruners and scissors all thrown in a big plastic bucket. I used to be a Girl Scout and believe in being prepared...I don't even bother sweeping the dead leaves, mulch pieces or soil from the floor of my trunk anymore..lol.
    Gotta share a short story here..
    I make several trips a summer to my old hometown cemetery to visit my family's graves and tidy up the flowers I have planted there and often see some of the same people doing the same thing. There is a lady that visits there often too, close to where I go and she has some lovely peonies (newer cultivars). Years ago, I happened to go strike up a conversation with her, complimenting her on them and she invited me to dig up a start of all of them for me and told me to take whatever I wanted whenever I wanted! Well, I haven't taken any more than what she gave me that day, but have divided up what she gave me and given some away to other gardeners. Just one of the many times I have needed my emergency kit! I LOVE how the beauty of gardening just keeps going around and around...
    Have fun and good luck!
    Becki
    Becki B.
    Central Ohio
    Zone 5b-6

  12. #27
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    You were all with me as I approached my plant rustling destination...And... to my embarrassment I realized that the Asiatic lily from 30 feet away was an Americn weed at 5 feet away !
    But... I did find Wild Sweet Pea. Now, I decided to just leave it be until I found out if it is perennial(i.e., worth digging up). Anyone..Is it annual or perennial ?

  13. #28
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    Egads, now I'm replying to my own reply. I've been searching on sweet peas and am totally confused now. I did find one that is perennial(Everlasting sweet pea) but I guess what it comes down to is which sweet peas grow 'wild'(although it is where there was a house about 7 years ago--but the plants were pretty scattered) in south central Kansas and is Everlasting sweet pea one of them. I couldn't find any at the Kansas wildflower sites.

  14. #29
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    Cathy,

    Try the botanical name, Lathyrus latifolius, but I suspect you won't find much specifically about it in Kansas, for it is found in a very large area of the country...

    Have FUN!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  15. #30
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    Thanks Ann..I did search as you suggested. Well, I did see the hot pink flower but I'm thinking that there were leaves that seemed very long and slender. Now, I might have my facts mixed up because at the time I was thinking 2 things: 1) watch out for poison ivy and 2) where the heck does this thing meet the ground(for digging purposes). It actually looked quite flimsy at soil level which was another deterent thinking I'd just end up ripping it apart and finding out it's just an annual. I dunno; maybe I'll liberate one and see how things go. Now, off to the irises...
    Thank you !

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