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Thread: cuttings

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    mississippi
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    66

    cuttings

    Ann, When you took your cuttings from your mandevilla, did you take tip cutting or what? Did you take more than one cutting from a single vine ? I want to propagate them this year but don't want to cut all my blooms of by taking only tip cuttings. I bought 8 mandevilla to grow this year. Alice du pont, red riding hood, and a white one ( can't remember name).


    Kassy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Kassy,

    I do not do tip cuttings on Mandevilla. I use a long section of more mature vine and cut it into sections. Each section should contain at least 2 nodes, one for above the soil and one for below. Only remove the leaves from the nodes that will be under the soil.

    Just make sure you keep track of which side of the vine is up and which side is down. Fortunately, with the Mandevella, that should be easy. With some vines, like the Passiflora, that is not always the case.

    Good Luck!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Staten Island, NY
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    Mandevilla cuttings.

    I don't use the tips, either, but I use only one node on each. (This is the way they were done, when I purchased rooted cuttings.) To keep them right side up, I make a straight cut above the node, and an angled cut below. I stick them in the mix so that the middle of the node is even with the top of the mix.



    Occasionally, the plants produce a few seed pods. They are bean-like, about 4 inches long, and hang down, in pairs, like an inverted V. When they dry, and turn brown, they split open and the fluffy seeds are exposed. They're similar to dandelion seeds.





    On the one, bottom center, you can see part of the seed coat stuck on the leaf. Bottom left, you can see the seed coat and some fluff.

    Here they are, at 6 weeks.



    At 2 months, you can see the tuberous root starting to form.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Thanks, John!

    The pictures are GREAT!

    I do believe I will try the cuttings with only one node. I don't have an intermittent mist, but I have some other ideas...

    Do you remove the leaves? I assumed that you did, but perhaps that is not a good assumption since the node is at soil level, so I figured I had better ask.

    None of mine have ever gone to seed, so I appreciate the seed and seedling pictures also.

    Do you know how long it will take to bloom from seed?

    Have you ever tried to hybridize them?

    Just curioius....

    Thanks, Again, John! Makes one want to say MORE, MORE!


    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Tex .. near Dallas
    Posts
    280

    mandevilla

    babied 4 mandevillas for 3 years .. taking them in when the temp dropped ... and putting them back out when the temps. warmed. Then came the ice storm of 2003 .. now I don't have to worry about them any more .. they froze while we were out of town. Such is life

    Will probably try them again ... we like them a lot.

    Very nice pictues .. and information

    Jim

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Jim,

    Don't feel too bad.... It happens to all of us!

    I left one large potted mandevilla in my vegetable garden last fall. And, yep, you got it! It didn't take the cold before I realized it was left there. It hasn't recouped yet, so I suppose it is dead.

    I do have others that I started from cuttings, and if I didn't, this is one plant that I would obtain again because it does bloom so beautifully!

    I have several other large ones started from cuttings. Some of these will go into the landscape and if they do not make it, I will not worry about it because I have more cuttings that are growing.

    It is far easier to protect small plants rather than large ones until I can get that big greenhouse that I want. I am working hard on that....

    So.... It does happen to all of us from time to time! Just a fact of mother nature!

    Enjoy and have fun with it!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Staten Island, NY
    Posts
    121
    Ann,
    I cut the two leaves, at the node, in half.
    I've never tried to hybridize, or even polinate them. I keep hoping, though, that one time I'll get a sport - something different, but so far, all the flowers have been the same. The only thing different was I had one that put out three leaves, instead of two, at each node.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    mississippi
    Posts
    66

    rooted plants

    Where can you buy rooted mandevilla or seeds?

    Thanks
    Kassy

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Kassy,

    I don't know the answer to that last question.

    However, they are so very easy to propagate from cuttings, and because you can purchase quite large vines at relatively inexpensive prices, it seems to me that would be your best approach.

    For instance, let's say you purchased a large, full vine in a 3 gallon pot for $15. You could probably get AT LEAST 30 cuttings from it, and if you used the method that John is talking about, you could probably get even more than that.

    Then you take those rooted cuttings, sell what you can, let some grow larger, and repeat the process.

    If you watch really closely in the fall, they are often put on sale at a drastically reduced price. They are usually not blooming very much by that time of the year, but you could certainly get a lot of cuttings from them and root them over the winter.

    I don't know about the seeds. I've never had any go to seed.

    Good Luck, Kassy!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    Just a Thought....

    You might consider this vine for your zone...

    It's commonly called the Lavender Trumpet Vine, but the botanical name is 'Clytostoma callistegioides'.

    Remember that I told you about purchasing plants at the end of the year at extremely low prices? Well, this is one that I bought. The label said 'Trumpet Vine'. There was no more information than that, and I bought the 3 gallon vine fior $2 with no blooms, and dwindling leaves.

    I took a chance not knowing what the flower would look like, or whether even $2 was worth putting it in my landscape, but I had a feeling somehow that I would like it...

    Here is a picture of the blooms, and there are many, many!



    I know that no one likes to hear the terms 'Know your plants' and 'Do your research', but from the bottom of my heart, it does pay off to spend that extra time asking questions and knowing the most you can about specific types of plants.

    After a while of learning, I suppose you just sort of get this 'gut feel', and somehow I am trying to convey that process here....

    But first you have to be willing to explore and LEARN!

    And knowing the basics of propagating is a BIG start! I will propagate this one, and start several in my landscape exactly where I think they will thrive and look best...

    Enjoy!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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