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Thread: Spiral Ginger!

  1. #1
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    Spiral Ginger!

    Marguerite!

    This one is for you, since you are the first to ask me about this particular type of ginger....

    I have a friend that grows quite a few varieties of them. I asked her the same question that you asked me, and she gave me the same answer than I had found on the internet with one big BONUS!

    She said to take the cuttings before the first frost, remove all the leaves, and pot the cuttings at an angle in the soil (not verticle). This seemed somewhat unusual, but Nicky knows her gingers, so I gave it a try....

    I put the potted cuttings in the greenhouse which I barely keep above freezing during the winter. I kept the soil moist, and to my disappointment, I watched the stems turn brown. I gave them a tug and felt resistance, so just kept watering them as needed. The stems turned more and more brown, and I thought I had surely lost them, but again, when I tugged gently on them, there was resistance.

    Today, when I watered the plants in the little greenhouse, I notice a tiny green leaf showing itself just beside the base of one of the thick brown stems.

    I looked, and sure enough, there are roots coming out of the bottom of this one quart pot! I checked the others, and most were firmly implanted in the soil. I can hope for those. One didn't hold quite as well as the others, and up it came from the soil. But there they were, tiny little roots...

    I went inside and grabbed my camera so that you could see!



    and the tiny little sprout...



    Looks like I will have some Spiral Ginger after all! Now, we know the secret TRICK, courtesy of my friend, Nicky!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
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    Oh, GEE!

    Marguerite!

    I had forgotten that this is a variegated spiraling ginger! The new leaf that is forming is very pretty. I can't wait to see it grow into a full size plant!

    Now, all I have to do is to make sure the slugs stay OFF my new little plants.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
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    Ann
    I just got a alpinia zerumbet variegated ginger would I propagated this the same way.
    Eugene
    Gene

  4. #4
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    Gene,

    I have been told that this method works best for the 'spiral' gingers and that other gingers are not easy to propagate from cuttings.

    Spiral means that the leaves grow in a spiral fashion around the stem, not that the stem forms a spiral.

    It doesn't mean that it is impossible, it just means that is what my research and friends have told me...

    I was also told that it was difficult to grow ginger from seed, but I have discovered that there are too many different varieties of gingers to make that generalization.

    I have some seedlings growing now from a tropical ginger, and I surely wish I had the name, but I do not. It is just that the seeds were free, and all I know is that it is a tropical ginger used as a houseplant and not in the garden (ie., short in stature and requiring less light) and that the flowers are white and fragrant....

    Most gingers are propagated by division of rhizomes, but GEE, if it were me, and they were going dormant for the winter, I wouldn't hesitate to give it a try!

    Give it a try, Gene, and please let us know...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Staten Island, NY
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    Gingers from seed.

    I have grown Alpina zerumbet, Shell Ginger, and A. Zerumbet variegata, Variegated Shell Ginger from seed. Both were fairly easy. The only thing, with the variegated one, is that sometimes the variegation is not as pronounced in the seedling. A lot of them are now being produced by tissue culture. That way, you can retain the intense variegation of the parent, and you can get a lot more than by division. They have colorful seed pods.



    John_NY
    USDA Zone 6/7
    Sunset Zone 34

  6. #6
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    John,

    Thanks so much! I have seen that one at a school that I teach as well as in some commercial buildings. They sometimes have them at Lowe's, but they are quite expensive.

    Now, I will know to watch for seeds, huh? Do you have any pictures of the bloom? Is it large, small, tiny, and does it have a fragrance like some of the gingers do? I am curious. You know me, always keeping my eyes open for seeds to try!

    The one that I am growing from a cutting is quite different. I don't have a picture of the adult plant, so I will have to use one from a wholesale nursery. I will add a link to that wholesale nursery just below the picture in case any of you are interested.



    Heliconia Paridase

    and here is the progress my baby is making....

    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  7. #7
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    Kirbyville,Texas
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    Thanks Ann and John NY

    I'm glad to hear from you John. I have never grew the ginger plant before I can't wait to get some seeds and grow more I'm hopeing my wife can use them in her floral arangements.She just fell in love with them when she saw them. John I hope all is well in New York, Take care and have a blessed Easter
    Thanks Eugene J Babinat

    PS Ann I think I'll give it a try this fall when they go dorment Thanks Ann
    Gene

  8. #8
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    Again, For Marguerite.....

    And here is how much a couple of my babies have grown since that last picture was posted. They are about 2 foot tall now, and new shoots are coming up from the base. Amazing, just from a little stick...

    And they do indeed SPIRAL!



    Thanks, Marguerite!!! I miss you, and I will think of you every time I see these as I step outside my back door....

    Pretty, aren't they?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  9. #9
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    Hi, Everyone!

    I posted about this plant on Mike in Houston's Gulf Breeze tropical forum.

    Someone asked questions about how I did it and how long it took... It seemed to me that the new growth came from the same node as the roots, and that the new growth was close to the surface. I really couldn't remember, and it was hard to tell by the picture.

    Also, it seemed that it took forever for the new growth to appear, but I knew that I had taken the cuttings shortly before our cold weather hit. I had not tried summer cuttings.

    Well, on June 12, 2003, I tried some more cuttings, lots of them. Some are already showing new signs of growth.



    These are definitely fast to root, and only a few are showing new growth like this, but most seemed to have rooted. I have them outside under the old pecan trees and we are getting LOTS of rain.

    As you can see, the new growth is coming from the same node joint as the roots... Also, there appears, on this one anyway, to be a new shoot forming on the next node up from that one.

    What FUN!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  10. #10
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    I get this question more than any other...

    Will it root in water?

    The second most frequent question is how many nodes below the soil and how many above?

    Well, on this particular ginger, I wasn't sure because it was my first ginger to try to propagate.

    So, I had an extra branch and decided to try it in a bucket of water. It is rain water because at that time we were getting a lot of rain.



    Here's another....



    I do believe the pictures tell the story, don't you? I will tell you this much, the new roots and new foliage were all submerged in water. The stem that was not in water kept its foliage, but did not have the extra growth.

    And, yes, I removed the foliage that was submerged.

    Neat, huh?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    SE of Houston, TX
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    Ann sent me in July, a root/rhizome clumb of this ginger with a few stems left on. She cut all the other stems for propagating by cuttings, and I had lost this ginger previously and was unable to find another source. I took three short stems that had been tip cut, dipped them in #2 hormodin (#1 would have done fine), placed them in course sand and they were rooted in 3-4 days!

    It is definitely not hardy below 50 degrees and won't survive at all below 40. It is so beautiful that it is worth protecting overwinter and growing. The foliage has a very pubescent and soft feeling. I have seen the bloom on it, typical Costus speciosus type bloom but white in color. The clump must be very mature and the plant not exposed to below 40-50 degrees for 18 months or more in order to bloom. I have used Alfalfa tea - an old rosarian fertilizer recipe - to speed up the growth and blooming process with gingers.

    I am going to try rooting hedychiums by stem cuttings and will report the results. I suspect they may be as easy as Costus speciosus or any other "cane" type ginger.

    The rooting in plain water is a surprise Ann. I will try the Hedychiums both ways to see what happens. Isn't plant research fun.

    --------------
    Bob Beyer, Clear Lake City, Houston, TX
    "Ornamental Horticulture for the Houston and Gulf Coast Area"
    http://www.houstongardening.info

  12. #12
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    Yes, Bob!

    The rooting in water was a surprise me, more than you know. You see, I am the world's worst at rooting in water except for coleus, but I am learning. That was a stem from the rhizomes that I sent you in July, so you know they have grown that much in one month.

    I am sure you also know that there is very little information about propagating ginger (other than division) on the internet, so I was really fascinated by the discovery. I had to get the pictures, though, or no one would believe me.

    Makes you want to try more propagating experiments, doesn't it?

    Now, you know why I am hooked!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  13. #13
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    For some reason, this thread gets a lot of hits. I haven't been able to figure out where the link is...

    This one needs to be moved to subtropicals (although it is truly tropical).
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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