+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2
1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16

Thread: Viburnum!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    Viburnum!

    I have struggled with this topic for quite some time...

    My neighbor has two of them. One is in partial shade, and although it is beautiful, the one that they recently planted in full sun is even more beautiful, especially right about now!


    A photo taken a week ago....



    And a beautiful snowball on a sunny, warm day....



    BUT, to my dismay, there is another viburnum that I have fallen in love with... It has a leaf that is crinkled in appearance, and so very different. The foliage alone makes you want to grow this form.

    And as luck would have it, there appears to be many, many varieties of this plant, most called a 'Snowball' Viburnum!

    It seems that there are many forms of this plant, and unfortunately they are sometimes called by the exact same common name, when they are, indeed, very different plants....

    But Gee, I like them both and I need more WHITE BLOOMS in my garden! So, guess what?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598

    Go For It

    Viburnum macrocephalum (Chinese Snowball Viburnum) in your picture &
    Viburnum plicatum (Japanese Snowball)

    There are several others that have the same type bloom, but smaller than macrocephalum, but often mistakenly called "Snowball". To confuse us even more there is at least one white "snowball" hydrangea. Never go into a nursery, especially the big box type, and ask for a snowball bush. There is no telling what you may come away with.

    Take new growth cuttings in June-July, 3000-5000 ppm IBA. They resist transplanting, so start the cuttings in a container that will hold them through at least one dormant period, 4" to 1 gal will do. I think they like a soil just a bit on the acid side. ( feed mine with Cotton Seed Meal with an occasional azalea mix)

    As you can see from Ann?s pictures, they take on a natural sort of loose rounded form. They can get to be 6? to 8? high, and nearly that wide. So use caution in choosing a site for one. Full sun to partial shade.

    In about a week or two, I?ll get some pictures that are really hard to believe.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    northeast Tennessee
    Posts
    1,703
    To add to the confusion- there are some viburnams that are grown for the berries they have in fall The one I like(and want) is called blueberry muffin.
    My Dad's viburnam is very old and at least 12 feet tall. I have started many cutting from it. They are very popular in my part of the country.
    tennessee sue

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598

    As Promised

    Here are a couple of shots of the viburnum I mentioned above. You will notice a slight discoloration on some of them. The problem is, some are not fully open yet, others were when we had the frost last week thus, strange colors. But as the days go by most of the slight off color will turn to pure white.







    If this doesn't work you can blame Ann, she is my teacher. Of course, if it does, she gets credit.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    Oh, My GOSH!

    Tom, Tom, TOM!

    Now, I know I am going to take a few cuttings of my neighbor's....

    It may take awhile, but Gee! Aren't they worth the wait!?!?!?!!!!

    Thanks, TOM!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598
    This is, in my opinion, one of the hidden treasures of gardening. They are good looking shrubs all year here. There seems to be some blooms on them all the time, but NOW is their season.

    I think you will also be surprised at how fast they will grow. The one in the picture was in a 2 gal pot from the nursery just about 3-4 years ago! They do need some pruning to keep them generally in shape, but looking natural. If you like a 'formal' look, this plant is not for you. Dirr says he cuts his way back about every 4-5 years, but I like to do some reach in, and tip prunning to keep them growing inside, and producing multiple bloom stems. Do not prune after July. Also, NEVER ask "how do I make it into a tree?" Like most plants, they do best when left in or near their natural shape.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  7. #7

    Hey Tom!

    I hope you all don't mind me reading posts in here since I do not have a nursery or greenhouse, but I love reading anything about plants!
    I have some really silly questions about your message regarding taking stem cuttings from Viburnums. Do you use rooting hormone powder? Could you just explaint to me in detail, exactly what you do to root these?
    My daughter's mother in law has a beautiful one about 5' tall and that wide. They hand prune it as you mentioned ,every other year or so to keep it in a pretty dense and softly rounded form . It is loaded with beautiful blooms! Is it best to wait until after it blooms to take the stem cuttings?
    Thanks for any info!
    Becki
    Becki B.
    Central Ohio
    Zone 5b-6

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Hi, Becki!

    I don't have a nursery, nor does Tom! It's a love that we have in common with those that are trying to learn to start one.

    I seperated the threads into two different forums because there was so much there that was distinct and so many that were starting their own business, but it is amazing how many interests are the same...

    I will let Tom and others answer your questions as they know more about it than me...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598
    Becki,

    I'm trying to learn how to propagate them myself.
    2 years ago I took about 25 cuttings, stuck them in a mix of fine pine bark, perlite, and peat. I diligently misted them with the water hose in their shady spot and a lot of the took root, and started putting on new growth. Over in the fall, about 3 months after sticking them, I took them out of the nursery container, and potted each one separately. That day I learned a new lesson. The root system grows very slowly at the beginning, and I killed all but 2. Those 2 sat in a simi-shade spot for the rest of the summer, and all winter. They just didn't seem interested in growing. I gave them a little cotton seed meal, and they started growing some. That summer, when they were a year and a half old, I planted them in the ground, and got a real shock. They took off like a shot, and both bloomed this past spring.

    I just finished about 100 cuttings of new growth and this time I stuck each one in it's own fairly large cell (about 2"sq, by 3" deep) and plan to leave them in there till next fall. I used 8000PPM IBA rooting hormone. You see, they do not like to be transplanted when they are young, because the root system is so small. This way, I can just insert the entire plant and all it's media into a new, larger pot. Also, this year, I'm just finishing a misting station that will aid in this project and a couple others.

    I've got some pictures of the cuttings I just made that may help you see exactly what I'm doing, and the size of the cuttings. I'll get them to Ann soon so she can post them. So, stay tuned, there will be more. I'll try and give you a blow by blow description with the pics.
    Last edited by Tom; 05-23-2003 at 10:26 PM.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  10. #10

    I'm so excited!

    Oh thank you Tom!
    Couple of questions.. Did you take woody stem cuttings or green? How long? Did you cut the leaves in half or remove?
    What kind of pot did you put these in that you could repot the whole pot?
    I can't wait to hear and see your play by play..lol. This is fantastic!
    becki
    Becki B.
    Central Ohio
    Zone 5b-6

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598
    Becki

    I hope I can help you and others with this explanation, if there are more questions, just ask. If I know the answer, I'll be happy to help.
    This first picture is a cutting that was taken in the middle of May, well after the main flush of blooms. It is the tender end of the newest growth. This cutting was pulled from the branch in a downward motion, which leaves a small 'heal' on the base. This particular cutting also has 4 leaf nodes, and all but the top full leaves have been cut away, plus half the large leaves.





    Just the tip end of each cutting (about 1/4") was dipped dry into 0.08% IBA rooting hormone. That is the strength recommended by Dr. Dirr.

    I know, as with all softwood cuttings, it is very important to keep them moist and not let them wilt. We were pruning some large limbs from an established plant and kept a bucket of water right there to put them as they were cut. As I prepared the cuttings, I kept a pan of water next to me, and placed the cut end in there as soon as possible.

    I hope to show some other pictures that will demonstrate more clearly the actual size of the cutting and special handling.

    I may have mislead you about planting the 'whole pot'. The little flexible cell packs, like you buy annuals in, are 2" square, and 3" deep. When time comes I can slip the rootball, and all the soil out with much less distrubance of the roots. The previous try was in a standard bed and the plants had to be dug, or pulled up and generally all the soil fell off them.

    I will be taking more cuttings in June, then again in July.

    Stay tuned
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  12. #12

    Stem Cutting Crazy!

    Thanks Tom for all the info!
    Well, I have been on a mission today to take as many stem cuttings as I had pots to pot them in. I took 3 stem cuttings from a Viburnum, 9 from a Verigated Dogwood shrub, 4 from a little Rosemary plant I just bought, 6 from a Vinca vine, 4 from a Heliotrope annual, and 6 leaf cuttings from a beautiful red Begonia plant. I also divided two different daylilies I just bought that had lots of multiple fans on them. It's been a good day!
    Also, I was out shopping at a local high $ garden center/nursery with my daughter that I am doing some landscaping for that built a house last year. We were shopping for trees... I saw the most beautiful tri-color Beech tree. label on the container said Tri-Color, tag on the tree said Purple Leaf Beech . Oh my gosh, it was beautiful! The shape of the leaves, the color of the leaves, the branching...I was drooling! BUT, it was $250. A little high for the price range we were looking for, but not bad for the maturity. It was approx. 15' or so.. My daughter went home to talk hubby into it..lol.
    Anyone grown one of theses or seen them at full maturity?
    Thanks again Tom, for the info! I will keep you posted on my results. I used the same methods you described exactly. I did not put them under plastic though, do you think it is necessary? It has been raining or cloudy for two weeks now here in Ohio it seems and the nights are real cool (40's) I have them in the house right now in a shaded window until the nights warm up a bit. Should I keep them out of full sun until growth starts or what?
    Becki
    Becki B.
    Central Ohio
    Zone 5b-6

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Oh, my!

    Tri-colored Beech! I have seen that one, and it is truly gorgeous. I don't blame you for drooling for I have admired them for a long time.

    I don't have one, probably won't ever have one, but they are especially nice!

    Thanks for sharing your fun day with us!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598

    Keep them ou of the sun

    Becki

    Some days we think the humidity is so high, that everything is too wet. But just when you are thinking that, it will drop, and the plants, without any roots, will be the first to feel it. Each time they droop, it takes a bit out of them. The plastic cover will insure against those times, and keep the humidity much higher than you would like in your house.

    I would never let the direct sun hit them, it will heat the leaves, and they will lose moisture rapidly. When they start losing moisture, the rooting process is slowed down. Remember, they have no roots to replace the moistue with, so when wind, and heat combine to dry the leaf surface, the plant trys to replace it through transpiration.

    When you first take a cutting, lots of stuff starts happening to both the source and your cutting right away. The plants natural defenses react in just a few minutes. It's natural auxin starts changing the the operation of cells at the wound site, it begins to heal that wound. This is why I take larger cuttings that I will be using until I can get them to the point of treatment and sticking into rooting hormone and then moist soil.

    As I prepare cuttings, I have a pan of water ready to stick them in immediately. I may be taking several cuttings from one large limb that is already in a bucket of water. After I have several cuttings prepared, I then pick them out, dry the cut end slightly, dip it into rooting hormone and drop it into a prepared hole in the rooting medium.
    Attached Images  
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  15. #15

    Thanks so much Tom!

    For sharing all that great info and the pics too!
    So far, only one of my stem cuttings is totally bowed over..lol.
    I think it bit the dust, but I will give it a few more days to recover. The rest are looking fine.
    Becki
    Becki B.
    Central Ohio
    Zone 5b-6

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2
1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts