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Thread: Greenhouse Production of Gerbera Daisies

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    9,934

    Greenhouse Production of Gerbera Daisies

    Like Shari, I am fascinated with these plants. They are considered to be annuals by most, but they tend to be hardy, herbaceous perennials here. They are very popular as gifts for Valentines and Mother's Day. You will find them on our Garden Center shelves or in the florist section most of the year. Unfortunately, many people do not realize that they will often survive zone 8 winters if provided mulch and planted in a warmer section of your landscape.

    Usually, you find the newer hybrid forms on the market, but there is another form refered to as 'California Mixed' that I have grown from purchased seeds. This variety is larger and has longer stems and a less doubled flower, but looks very good in the landscape.

    They are both easy to grow from seed and will produce many seeds in return.

    As we discussed before, the seeds do not remain viable for long, so, if you decide to grow them, you will probably want to plant all of them in the packet rather than try to save the rest for a later date.

    Here is a publication on the production of Gerbera Daisies...

    Greenhouse Production of Gerbera Daisies

    The blooms last a very long time, and they are beautiful in cut flower arrangements.

    It is so very exciting when I see them popping up this time of the year, and I noticed that quite a few started to emerge several weeks ago, and I have a few in the little greenhouse blooming right now. I will be collecting seeds from these.

    They can also be grown as a patio plant during warmer seasons and/or as a houseplant during the winter.

    Enjoy!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    I am Bumping...

    I am bumping this post due to recent threads about Gerbera Daisies. And, yes, Vicki, we are fortunate that they do seem to survive most years in the ground here.

    I enjoy them. They bloomed most heavily in the spring and fall this year. Drought in the summer heat really hurts them, but they seem to be tolerant of dry weather in the spring and fall.

    What a treat to see them bloom! The blooms last for such a very long time!

    Hope this thread helps...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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