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Thread: containers vs field growing

  1. #1

    containers vs field growing

    Last summer I ran across freeplants.com which led me to this site.
    I read these posts religiously and have gathered much information from all of you . Thank you so much.
    After purchasing Mike's ebook I was hooked on a backyard nursery, and now have about 300 rooted cuttings gently resting under the snow, and was wondering if I should grow them on in containers or field grow them.
    My plan is to sell them retail off the driveway for 4.00 bucks each.
    The added water cost for container plants isn't a big issue. I am mostly concerned with developing the healthiest and most attractive plants possible.
    I was wondering if you all had some advice for this newbie.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    As Promised....

    I am restoring this post from the old site...

    Kevin,

    That is really a tough question to answer, so it is no wonder that you are struggling in your efforts to make a decision.

    You see, it all depends on which plant/tree/shrub you are wanting to grow. Some will do fine in pots, and if they do, that may be your least labor intensive way to go. Others will do better in the ground....

    Another thing to consider is your climate. It seems to me that plants that are marginally cold hardy will do better in the ground where their roots will not get as cold. I have some in pots still that would do fine in the ground, but I don't dare leave them outside with no protection if the temperatures are going to get down to 20 degrees or below. Some will not even survive 28 degrees when in pots above the ground.

    I hope that some others will contribute this type of information on a plant by plant basis...

    Good Luck and I'll try to remember to bump this thread once in awhile so that others will be sure to respond with their experiences!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Kevin,

    Here is an article that I hope will help....

    Nursery Field Production

    By the Agricultural Extension Service
    The University of Tennessee

    I found another article that I will post in a bit....
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    More....


    Best Managemnet Practices for Field Production of Nursery Stock


    by NC State University,
    College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    And Still More....

    Some observations and opinions from Ohio State University...

    Pot in Pot Nursery Production Technique Becoming a Growing Trend
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Another....

    from Georgia:

    Production and Marketing of Field Grown Trees in Georgia

    By the Cooperative Extension Service,
    The University of Georgia
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  7. #7

    Thanks Ann

    Thank you for the information
    You are probably the most responsive board manager out there

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Kevin,

    The question that you asked was an excellent one. Many are struggling with the answers to that specific question. If you listen to the salesman, they will ALWAYS convince you to do it the way that use their products. That is their job.

    If you listen to a nurseryman that is selling a product being grown one way or another, they will ALWAYS convince you that the way they have chosen to grow them is the best way. That is there job.

    The experience of a few may not be what is best for you as an individual and under your specific environment and circumstances.

    I firmly believe that everyone should gather as many facts as possible and thoroughly understand the options before making a decision such as this that could make or break your success.

    I hope you will continue to read and learn as much as you can. This world of the internet is a wonderful place, but as you can see, the information is more pertinent to some areas of the world than to others. But we can always learn from their experiences, irregardless of where they are from... You simply have to take differences of climates and conditions into acount.

    I have traveled extensively with my work in previous years, and I have learned that every area in the country is quite different. And I respect that...

    Thanks so very much for your kind words of encouragement!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    443

    Disaster struck

    this winter has all but devastated me.
    these are all field grown that i am discussing here!
    the golden vicary privets are severely winter scorched.
    i think they will bounce back.
    my blue girl/boy hollies are more than 50% dead.
    that is a big loss.
    no one knows what winter or for that matter mother nature will throw at you .
    you do your best to protect your shrubs and you still get beat down.
    now this by no means will stop me . just delay the end results .
    which is sales.
    nobody can tell any of us the best way do get to market because
    ma nature holds the cards.
    even a few losses in the coldframe.
    these shrubs i lost were for one , destined to be cutting stock , and were used as that last year ,
    and 2,
    future 20 and 30 dollar shrubs.
    i cant give you{ kevin in mo . } advice as to what is the best way to do get any plant to market. we try to do our best , but sometimes best isnt good enuf.
    its all a gamble.hard as we work at it.
    just think if you grew that one plant that managed to survive this harsh winter that everyone is begging for , we could have it made.
    good luck with your nursery because i cant give a cut and dried answer.
    shepp zone 5/6

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    443

    additional to previous psot

    as i was told that supper was ready and i finished the previous post . this is todays day
    i worked in the nursery for 12 hours today before getting on the pc to see how the rest of the gardening world was doing.
    any way i got up out of my office chair and walked into the house from my caboose office all hunched over acheing from every bone
    in my body,
    as i made my way to the dinner table .she looked up at me to see me acheing and my words were
    " i will never say die".
    so no matter how bad it gets or how much i hurt or what mother nature throws at me , if i live till i am 80 , i will continue to do what i do.that is propagate in my garden and nursery.
    i had a good dinner.
    lifes little pleasures.
    enjoy yours pleasures life is short, pick your enjoyment.i did today
    a bad day in the nursery beats a good day working for a fortune 500 company.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    northeast Tennessee
    Posts
    1,703
    Amen to that Shepp. I love working in the nursery even though it is hard work.
    Sorry you lost so much. We survived pretty well so far but I expect another cold spell and every thing is starting to bud out.

    To anyone considering this as a business, you have to be tough and you have to love it. You sure can't go into it just for the money.
    tennessee sue

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