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Thread: cutting lengths

  1. #16

    Curly Privet

    Do you know the name of your curly privet and remember the source where you found it, Ann? This has become my favorite plant at the present time, due to its usefulness as a fast-growing utility plant in the garden and its wonderful aromas when blooming. I have variegated and regular ordinary privet. Like the boxwoods, which I want to get exemplars of all the different ones I can find, I would like to locate and add one of those to my collection of mother plants. Stand alone privets that are trimmed to tree form also make a beautiful specimen plant when they are in bloom. The best part is the the perfume. I plan to raid the next season's blooms for potpourri!

    I was pleased to find that the viburnum odorissimum that I took cuttings from and stuck about two oro three weeks ago have rooted and are sending out new growth. I got sick in the middle of this project and have a pot of hardwood cuttings stuck in water, they are also very green and healthy looking and look like they may also be continuing up some new growth. Has anyone ever rooted hardwood cuttings in water? If not, this seems like a pretty good candidate! My intention was to stick them but it was so muddy and I just couldn't stay out in that part of the garden to get them in the ground. It will be interesting to see what happens. This is such a beautiful plant, it is almost variegated, with the glossy green leaves and some of them shade to chartreuse, yellow and a little copper color. I believe I may get blooms on my mother plant this spring, it has grown about three feet in the full sun position I have it in.
    Marguerite, GrannyGarden
    www.kirbyville.net
    www.tex-la.net

  2. #17

    Box Woods

    marguerite


    I am about convienced only young people should grow boxwood -- the rest of us don't have time -- they are S L O W!

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    Privet Hedges

    Marguerite,

    I believe that the botanical name for my curly leaf privet is Curly Leaf Ligustrum japonicum 'Rotundifolium', but there may be more than one form of Curly Leaf Privet.

    It is not at all like the privet hedge. It grows very slowly, and it only has a few blooms which do not have as much fagrance as the more common privet hedge.

    The leaves on the Curly Leaf Privet are thicker, about 2 inches long and have a waxier coating. This evergreen shrub only gets to be about 3-5' tall. Mine is 5' tall, and I have had it for many, many years. I probably bought it at the old Walmart since there were not very many stores here at the time.

    I don't recall seeing it in the retail stores since then.

    Here is a closeup of the leaves:




    Here is a view of the privets behind my next door neighbor's house. His are nicely trimmed so that he can mow his ditch without hitting his head... Mine are not pruned at this time and are in bad need of it.

    These privets are covered with small white, extremely fragrant blooms in the spring. In the fall, they are loaded with black berries that the birds enjoy. My pots are filled with seedlings and so are my beds.

    I only wish you lived closer, you could have as many as you wanted...



    These are somewhere between 20-30 foot tall, and there is a row of them that is approximately 2,000 feet long. Actually, I would love to have them cut down, but I wouldn't have a break from the north wind, AND they are not on my property.

    The dormant trees inside the fence are my 'baby' pecan trees (inside my yard). The one toward the back has small, hard pecans that are very rich and oily. It was a seedling that I couldn't bear to cut down.


    As to your sweet viburnum, I have never heard of them rooting in water, but they are supposed to root easily using traditional methods.

    In fact, I cannot personally think of any 'hardwoods' that root in water, but I have seen people successfully root some semi-hardwoods in water.

    If they don't root, then you might want to consider cutting off some of the lower end of the branches and rooting them when you are feeling better. They may hold up until then.

    Please let us know!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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