+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Figs?

  1. #1

    Figs?

    Tom or some of the other fig growers.

    Is there one I might grow in Ohio? Have greenhouse but I have not been heating it in the winter -- it stays about 10 degrees warmer than outside and of course has no wind chill. I am zone 5 (mostly) have a number of micro-climes on property and not too far from where zone six starts (I think).

    Jim Lang

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598

    That's pretty cold

    I can't tell you about these southern plants in your zone. I've never even considered figs for that area.

    I grew up in southern Tenn, and it was sorta rare when we got a good crop of figs there. Even here in central Ala, the crop is often lost to late frost.

    You might check on the Ohio State web page for information on cultivars that may do well there.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  3. #3

    Fig trees loose all their leaves at first cold spell

    I was surprised in late September when my new Celeste fig denuded itself. Thought I had killed it.

    If you're absolutely determined to grow a fig tree in Ohio or wherever you are, it is possible. It is also a lot of trouble. Don't know what kind of crops you would get. This will work for a banana plant too, which is a tropical guest also in your neck of the woods, hibiscus, etc..

    You have to build its own little solarium. Here's what you look for, a sheltered L with a Southern exposure on the South side of your house, it doesn't have to be a BIG Jog just a small one to knock the wind off it, if there is absolutely no little ell anywhere you can plant it in then plant it near a Southern facing wall of the house. If you're on a slab, you're okay. If you are on a pier structure, you will have to put plastic or boards at the bottom to keep cold air from coming onto the plant. Then you need to get either 4 landscape timbers or more discreet and aesthetically pleasing, some poly pipe, the stiff kind. and bury some 12" or longer poly pieces larger than your uprights to make a knockdown frame for your plants little winter house.

    Remember, this is just for the dead cold of winter, you have to protect, the rest of the year you will enjoy your glorious tropical plant. If you have a window near where you plant your plant, you can make sure your plastic area goes around the window, then you can open a small opening in the window into the covered plant area and share a little of your house heat on blue cold nights, or hang a lightbulb in there. Two coats of plastic, and perhaps for freezes even a frost blanket over that.

    In fall cover the entire ground around this plant with mulch, more is better, even a foot would be good, so now you have some place to dump your fall leaves. Also after the fig tree is denuded, the branches will sunburn, so you need to mix up a big bunch of white wash and slather it on the branches. By this time, are you sure you wouldn't just rather order some figs from Greece or Spain or Portugal? LOL

    Down here, during the coldest night, banana tree people wrap them in sheets, bedspreads, quilts all manner of festoonery.

    If you protect in this manner, you could also even grow citrus, a crop however, I am not sure what kind of results you would have.

    My view is if you want one badly and are going to that much trouble why not just build a small solarium onto the South End of your house, then you can do tropicals, orchids and houseplants galore. They call them a "Florida room" here. If you add a black painted concrete block wall and dark stone floor, you will gain a lot of solar heat during the day which will help ensure success.
    Marguerite, GrannyGarden
    www.kirbyville.net
    www.tex-la.net

  4. #4

    BURGESS DWARF FIG

    Jim, looking on page 26 of the BURGESS 2003 catalog, here's what it says:

    BURGESS DWARF FIG
    A true fig from trees that reach 6 feet. The sweet fruits are good for eating fresh, canning, drying or in cookies or cakes. Where temperatures drop below 5 deg. F, they need TUB PLANTING so the tree can be moved to shelter to both ripen the fruits and protect the tops. Root is hardy anywhere, but the top will die back below 5 deg. F.

    N6258 $7.85 each, 2/$14.95

    Burgess Seed and Plant Co.
    905 Four Seasons Road
    Bloomington, IL 61701
    (309) 663-9551
    WEBSITE: www.eBurgess.com
    or
    www.DirectGardening.com

    I noticed in the last HARBOR FREIGHT HARDWARE MAILER that they have a movers flat dolly like you put refrigerator's on for $14.95; you could rig up a pretty good patio arrangement with a half barrell and one of these little movers with a nice piece of plywood over it for year round growing. Just scoot it into the garage when the temps near 5 deg. F.

    I remember one time I described my little citrus protector with the poles and plastic but Mike in Ohio said it would not work there, the trees would still freeze to a crisp.
    Marguerite, GrannyGarden
    www.kirbyville.net
    www.tex-la.net

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Santee-Cooper Lakes, South Carolina
    Posts
    94
    Parks has a smaller Black Fig that I may try -- I am sure that I will have to move it inside. Our problem here is more prolonged cold than just an occasional minimum. I don't remember it being above freezing this month.
    Jim Lang

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Jim,

    What can I say?

    It was above 70 degrees today, and despite the clouds moving in for another cold front that will bring us down to lows of 20 this weekend, I must say, I enjoyed the change!

    Just makes you want to work harder to retire down south, huh?

    They say that we are spoiled...

    Perhaps, but this is where I was born and raised, and despite living in other areas of the country, I seem to always come back!

    I guess that means that this is where I am meant to be...

    Fig trees are huge here and loaded with fruit. I will have to try to find that picture I took this summer... Give me awhile, okay?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Remember the 'Forrest Gump' thread?

    Well, when I created that thread, I also took this picture of fig trees next to my Aunt's shrimp loading shop at the Bayou.



    Now, the old saying is that if you plant the fig tree near the south entrance of your home, and you talk to it each time you pass it, you will get more figs.

    In my Master Gardening class, this very topic was addressed, and this is what we learned from their research....

    If you plant your fig tree near the cement foundation of your home, the alkalinity from the cement will aid in the health of the fig tree. Also, if you plant it on the south side of your home (another of those old time beliefs), it will protect the fig tree from the harsh north winds.

    Good luck with your fig trees, Jim!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Santee-Cooper Lakes, South Carolina
    Posts
    94
    Now there's an Idea. Instead of moving the fig tree up here where it doesn't want to be I'll go to the figs instead! Sounds like a plan.
    Jim Lang

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Hey!

    I have just realized that I may need to be a little more clear on the alkalinity issue...

    You see, we have very aciditic soil and it helps the fig trees to add a little lime to raise the PH. That is why they do better by the cement slabs/foundations or cement steps!

    Hope that Helps!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  10. #10

    Great hint about the cement!

    Buddy Gene and I are trying to root "Grandma's Fig" probably a Brown Turkey. When I set my cuttings out to the garden, I think it would be a super idea to get some cinder blocks and sakcrete and make each one its own little retaining wall on the north side, such an idea!!!! Of course as well as providing alkalinity and northern protection the little miniwall could serve as a shelf for beaucoups container plants along its top! Part of my countrification is being delighted in finding out how cheap some of this stuff is, like cinder blocks are only about $1 each here, so I could do a miniwall for like $15 each. Sounds good to me!
    Sometimes it is little hints like this that make the very difference in success and failure with gardening projects. Every year my original figs make a few lonely figs and I'm sure the squirrels radar them before they are even ripe.
    Marguerite, GrannyGarden
    www.kirbyville.net
    www.tex-la.net

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Kirbyville,Texas
    Posts
    156
    Rita
    I think I got six of the figs to root. If you should want more will tip them and put them under mist this summer also I can give you some Celestic and Everbearing come mid summer.
    Eugene
    Gene

  12. #12

    Thanks, Gene

    No, I just want one of "Grandma's fig" I'm setting out the little Celeste when it leafs back out and that cutting in the back garden, that's about all the room I have for figs. Whenever you get the time. Just keep the rest and try to do yourself a mother plant from the best looking one, we'll track down the exact cultivar sooner or later.
    Marguerite, GrannyGarden
    www.kirbyville.net
    www.tex-la.net

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934

    Figs

    Can you tell that I am excited about the arrival of spring? I need to remember to put some lime around my fig tree!

    One of my favorite fruits.... My tree is still little, and for some reason my neighbor had the cut back the two enormous ones in their back yard.

    I think I'd better try Tom's method of propagating figs SOON, if I want my fair share, huh? They are truly expensive to purchase.....

    Home Fruit Production - Fig

    by the Texas A&M University

    Fig Production Guide

    by the Alabama Cooperative Extension System

    Hunter and I both love them fresh, if we can manage to keep the bird net on them so that we can get a few....

    My favorite, though, absolutely by far, are the fig preserves like my grandmother used to make with 'candied' lemon rind...

    YUM!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts