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Thread: What is the difference?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    What is the difference?

    Ann, thanks for your info on mike's board. I am trying. I do want to buy stock to sell, then when I prune I will make more root cuttings. I do plan on planting the plants to take cuttings.


    Ok, What is the difference between dantura and brugmansia?


    Thanks
    Kassy

  2. #2
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    Kassy,

    To put it plain and simple, Datura is a very tender perennial and in our zone should be considered a annual, whereas the Brugsmansia is more hardy and will withstand our mild winters...

    When I look at the two, the major difference I see is the difference in the stems, the main branches. Also, the flower of the brugsmansia droop straight down in a pendulous fashion, whereas the Datura is more upright, almost, but not quite perpendicular to the ground.

    The stems on the Datura are also more delicate, where the Brugmansia is almost canelike in size.

    Otherwise, the minor differences in varieties can be seen in the seed pods, which in some are spiny, and others just resemble a naked brain, sorry, but that is what it looks like...

    Obviously, it is not always easy to tell the difference, but if I were to give you an easy rule of thumb, it would be this. If the main stem is 3/4 inch or greater in diameter, it is a Brugsmansia. If it is 1/2 inch or smaller, it is a Datura.

    Also, as I indicated, the uprightness of the bloom will tell you a lot... Pendulous, Brugsmansia, perpendicular to earth, a Datura!

    That is all I can tell you...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
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    I have had both. A devil's trumpet with the "brainy" seed pod, and 2 others that the seed pods looked like bean pods. I understood your explanation very well.

    One other question, when wanting to collect seeds, how can you tell when they are ready to be collected?


    Kassy

  4. #4
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    When they burst open, or dry up, they are ready to harvest...

    I am not aware of either, btw, that look like bean pods, so maybe we are talking about something totally different?

    What do you think?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #5
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    The seeds on the btw may not look like bean pods to you but to me they did, but would should they actually looks like.


    If you collect the pod before it drys , will it still be good when if does dry?


    Kassy

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Let me try

    Kassy,

    Both plants, Brug and Datura are in the 'niteshade' family. The leaves, plants, flowers and seeds are hallucinogenic, and quite posionous. For years they have been confused for each other by some very experienced people.

    As well as I can determine there is not any type or cultivar that has a bean shapped seed pod.

    They are all, just a little bigger than a golf ball, and the Datura pod is very spiney. There is a barely perceptable change in the color of the pod, when it is just about ready to burst, and cast the seeds. If you pick them too early, they will not ripen, and will not germinate.

    Perhaps you have a bean shaped seed pod from another trumpet flower, like one of the many trumpet creapers. Here are a couple of places I went to check them out:

    http://www.erowid.org/plants/datura/datura.shtml

    http://www.erowid.org/plants/brugman...ugmansia.shtml


    Beyond this and what is available on those two sites, I hope you get the answers you seek.
    Last edited by Tom; 12-30-2002 at 09:43 PM.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  7. #7
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    Now, I Get IT!!!

    Kassy, it took me awhile to figure out the source for the confusion with the seed pods, but I think I have....

    When you referenced Trumpet, could you by any chance be referencing a VINE rather than a shrub or bush? There is a plant called a Trumpet VINE that produces a bean like seed pod. The Cross Vine also produces a bean like seed pod. The Brugsmansia has a large trumpet shaped flower just like the Datura and thus the confusion about which is which on those.

    The easiest way that I know to distinguish between the two is the fact that the Brunsmansia has much thicker stems as seen below:



    But the Trumpet Vine and Cross Vine both have much smaller trumpet shaped flowers. The biggest difference between these two are the leaves, and I can attest to the fact that the Minnesota Red Trumpet Vine is very pretty, but invasive. I have had mine for years, and it has never bloomed.

    When it stops raining, I will try to take a picture of a Cross Vine seed pod for you, and I think I have a picture of a few of the flowers. If I can find them, I will post them for you. It's too late to get pictures of the Trumpet Vine foliage, as it is herbaceous and mine had died back to the ground...

    Are we starting to make sense, yet, Kassy?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  8. #8
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    Cross Vine Seed Pods and Flowers

    Here you go, Kassy....

    Cross Vine Seed Pods:




    and a picture of the flowers the first year that I had this plant. The vine is covered with flowers in the spring.



    You can get an idea of the sizes by comparing to the chain link size...

    Does that help?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  9. #9
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    I guess I am just stupid to this one. I bet what I mistook for seed pod were actually flowers not open. Come to think of it, Brugmansia didn't have seed pods only the datura did, Why would this be?


    Kassy

  10. #10
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    Brugs do not have a tendancy to self pollinate. They need another variety around and cross pollination needs to occur.

    Datura, on the other hand, tends to self pollinate very readily.

    Hope that helps! Sorry about the delay in response. This thread was recently brought to my attention due to activity...
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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