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Thread: seed starting

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    mississippi
    Posts
    66

    seed starting

    If I want to start seeds in the greenhouse, should I use lights. I have an idea for misting. Can someone also give me direction on what to do after the seeds have rooted? I am just starting and need some help.


    Thanks
    Kassy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    443

    READ THE POSTS ON

    read the posts on trade mags and click on the links Tom provided.
    read girl read .
    unless you have been naughty ask santa for a library card .
    Merry Christmas

  3. #3

    starting seeds

    Kassy baby, the best place to start a few seeds at a time would be in some kind of bin on top of your refrigerator where you have bottom heat. It is also warm up there because it is high and the heat rises in a room.

    You can use a flat, I inadvertently got a good one the other day when my health attendant got me two GLAD Ovenware 9x12 plastic pans and lids. She says oh I got the wrong thing, I sez no it will make a great seedling flat.

    You put STERILE SOIL into the container, hopefully with a lid, plant your seeds in the soil approximately 1 inch apart so you can easily separate them, moisten the soil well with sterile water such as bottled water, and put the lid on the container, slap it up on top of the refrigerator. In about four or five days, take it down and open it to see if you have sprouts. Many things take from 3 days to 10 days, and some, like citrus seeds, much longer.

    When the sprouts have started and are about one inch high, raise one side of the cover and jam it open with a plastic spoon or ruler so a little air can get in there to the seedlings, but yet it will still stay moist enough to germinate the rest of the seeds.

    You can do this in a greenhouse by placing your container on a special bottom heat heating pad which you can purchase at a garden center. Your seeds do not need light to germinate for the most part, check the instructions on back of the seed packet for different varieties, but once they get a permanent set of leaves, the first two are called cotlydons or something like that, then you need to pick them out of the soil and very gently transplant them to another little pot or dixie cups are what I use, then they need to be placed in the light. It is important to handle them by the leaves, not the stem because it will bruise easily and fall over. I usually scoop mine out with a teaspoon with a long handle or use the tip of a pencil or knitting needle for a dibble to avoid much handling.

    When they get a little larger, and have several sets of leaves, then you need to pinch out the growing tops of the seedlings so they can then start branching to make a stronger plant. When your seeds have reached about six or eight inches, they are ready to be set out into the garden, PROVIDED that the weather conditions are right.

    Otherwise, feed them with a weak solution of fish emulsion prepared by the instructions on the package and continue to grow them up in the greenhouse.

    I don't have any pictures but you can find step-by-step instructions with illustrations all over the internet, especially at University Hort Sites, by searching on www.google.com or www.lycos.com

    Good luck. Personally, I find starting from seeds are a big pain in the yingyang, and if I coudl afford it I would buy nursery plants for everything, but some varieties, it is the only way you can get starts. I'm going through this angst right now with pepper seeds because there are only 30 seeds to a pack and I don't want to lose anymore than I have to, and I am doing exotics.
    Marguerite, GrannyGarden
    www.kirbyville.net
    www.tex-la.net

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    443

    watering plants in Greenhouse.

    watering plants in the greenhouse.
    since you didnt mention what you were growing , i will pick the plant .
    impatien/ petunia/or bedding plants, and others etc . mist wont work, why ?because all you will have left is dead and diseased plants ,damping off for starters.leaf and fungal problems.
    fungus gnats etc.
    any time that you could bottom water would be one of the best ways . dont allow to stand in water all day they need oxygen as well (roots). there are some plants that need to almost dry out between waterings here is where its time for you to read about each one you grow.
    drip emitters work well for doing potted plants to finish them off for sale,like hanging baskets ,container plants. you still have to check that the system is working ,if the pot is light and the plant is wilted you will know its not working.check your emitters /hose
    solenoid valve/timer/wiring /etc.if all are dieing check to see if the water is on at the valve.
    it takes time and money to get setup for production.
    its taken hours and many resources to find the right equipment.
    just by going to a catalog doesnt mean all problems are solved.
    solenoid valves for instance are not created equal.
    some work on high pressure (city water) some low pressure(well)
    you have to be a jack of all trades . and you have to be in the greenhouse and observe.
    there was a lady down the road about 30 miles that slept in her greenhouse every winter.why ?so she would know if the power went off or her woodburner went out. and she cut the wood for it herself . she did that even in her late 80"s. she was tuff. but thats the way the old timers did it. they didnt have alarms to tell them the temps were low.
    good luck. shepp zone5/6.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Ky zone 6
    Posts
    66
    Kassy
    Planting seeds for the most part is not hard, just jump in and do it. Re-read all the above info it is all good, but we all have our own ways of doing things. I use pig mats to start all my seeds, and I don't cover them, but I have to be on my toes so they don't dry out. I also hand water everything from the bottom, I don't like to get the leaves wet at this point, they do turn to mush very easy, but that may be because the humidity is always very high here. If something starts to damp off I put a couple drops of bleach in the water, that seems to help. For some reason I always have better luck with seeds I have collected. Maybe anyone having extra seeds will send you some. What about it guys?

    Pat
    Log Cabin Pat

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    mississippi
    Posts
    66
    Thanks everyone, I guess I just have to try and try. I am one of those people scared of failure, so I drill things to death. Instead I should just learn from experience.


    Thanks
    Kassy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    northeast Tennessee
    Posts
    1,703

    seed starting

    Kassy, Don't be afraid of failure for we all have little )and big) failures in our lives sometimes. Don't let failure keep you from starting something you want to do. Failure is after all a very good teacher. Sometimes if something doesn't germinate it is because of bad seed, not something you did. Get seed from somewhere else and try again. I've had many seeds that didn't germinate or got damping off and died. I've had cuttings not root but that just made me more determined to keep trying. When I first started raising herbs to sell I started them on an electric blanket on tables in my basement. When they sprouted I put them under shop light with stacks of cardboard under them, so I could adjust their distance from the light. So where there is a will there is a way.
    Try to start with an amount of work you can manage and grow into it so you don't get too overwhelmed til you get the hang of it.
    Have fun with it. Good luck,
    tennessee sue

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