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Thread: Prick and Soak - Hibiscus Seeds

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Prick and Soak - Hibiscus Seeds

    About a month ago, I posted pictures of a 'blue hibiscus'. I decided to trying the seeds that had been given to me several months before. I tried to nick them by sanding them, but they were so small that the sanding destroyed the seed.

    I tried to just soak them, then grow them, but they didn't sprout.

    So, I decided to prick them with a pin. Actually, I just stuck the pin barely into the seed coat to make a tiny opening for water to be absorbed by the seed. Then I put the seed in moist kleenex, placed the kleenex in a zippered plastic freezer bag. Then I put it under fluorescent lights.

    I used a quilting pin so that the head of the pin would be easy to handle. You can see the pin to the left of my new optical wheel mouse in the pic...



    Here is the picture of the seedling today. On on the right, if you look really close, you can see one from a second batch that I started that I just transplanted today. It still has it's leaf inside the seed pod. They are under fluorescent lights, so the light is a little bright, but I think you will get the idea that this method works.



    I can't wait to see if the bloom is like the mother plant!

    Here is a picture of the mother plant:





    Enjoy!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western Michigan near Muskegon
    Posts
    1,462

    beautiful!

    Ann,
    Beautiful, I think blue is my favorite flower color.
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Favorite Colors

    My favorite flower color has changed over the years, but blue is my absolute favorite color for everything.

    I should have been born to have blue eyes, but I guess I will have to settle for admiring those that are fortunate enough to have them. Hunter's are an absolutely gorgeous blue color.

    This particular flower is a very pretty one, and the foliage is also very attractive, but it is tropical and will have to be protected until I have enough to make cuttings and can bare the thought of putting some of them in the ground only to not come back the next year. I have a feeling I can collect lots of seeds if I can leave the plants in the gound for six months.

    I was thrilled to find out that they produce seeds. Many tropical hibiscus do not produce very many. Also, another trick will be to see how many come true to color from seed.

    You know me and my seeds....

    Take Care!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western Michigan near Muskegon
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    1,462

    Hibiscus seeds

    Ann,
    I have 2 different kinds of seeds. One is white with red in the middle and the other is mauve colored star shaped, have not been able to find a pic. of that one.

    Can I start these like perennials? 6-8 weeks before the last frost, inside under lights?

    Will they grow if you just leave the pods to self seed?
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Vicki,

    In the case of the hardy hibiscus, they are a herbaceous perennial, meaning that they will die to the ground then spront back up in the spring. And yes, you can certainly start them before frost under fluorescent lights. That is how I have started this one, and it will stay there until it is large enough that I know that slugs will not eat the top of the tender seedling, then I will move it to my greenhouse where it will most likely grow a little leggy, but it will grow nevertheless. In fact, if it is leggy over the winter, I will simply take cuttings and make more for my flower beds this spring and hopefully get lots and lots of seeds.

    They will need warmth to germinate and bottom heat will help. I do not have bottom heat, but where they are germinating, I do not have to worry about heat. They are in a small room inside my home.

    I don't know about the varieties that you have, but the southeast native hibiscus will self sow here. However, not nearly as many of them will sprout if left up to nature.

    Here is a picture of our native red hibiscus:



    It gets rather tall and produces many, many seed pods.


    Hope that Helps!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western Michigan near Muskegon
    Posts
    1,462

    Yes!

    Ann,
    This is it! That's a native one. They just grow everywhere?
    No name just native? My friend gave it to me and called it a rose of sharon. So I'm confused here.

    If this one grows here and dies to the ground, then the ones they had at our Sam's club in the spring, will also? The ones with multiple stems, that say's hardy hibiscius? I didn't buy one because I have nowhere to overwinter it. Or so I thought.

    Learning more everyday..........

    How tall do the native ones get? Mine were about 31/2-4ft. This is the second year I had it (2). My friend gave it to me because the deer were eating it. They didn't have many blooms this year, but have hope for next year.

    Can you take hardwood cuttings of the rose of sharon?

    Happy Thanksgiving!
    Last edited by vicki; 11-27-2002 at 09:33 PM.
    Happy Growing,
    Vicki in West. Mich.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Re: Native Hibiscus

    Vicki,

    I started this one from seed that was given to me by my neighbor. He told me that it is a 'Georgia native'. Since then, I have heard many names for it including 'Texas Star', 'Scarlet Rose Mallow' and 'Swamp Hibiscus'.

    Although mine has never gotten that tall, my neighbor's is about 6-7 foot tall. His is in full sun whereas mine is in partial shade. Mine bloomed more the second year than it did the first, but still hasn't bloomed as prolifically as his does.

    Although this hibiscus is said to be a native of the southeast, I have been told that it is hardy to zone 6a.

    The only cuttings that I have done with Rose of Sharon are semi-hardwood cuttings. They are fairly easy to root.

    Enjoy!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Marietta, OH (z6)
    Posts
    5

    Golden Mouse Pad

    Hey Ann! We have the same mouse pad. I'm new to LANDSPRO, so if you've mentioned having Retrievers, I'm not aware of it. My wife and I have Golden mousepads, calendars, sweaters, etc.

    All dogs are great, but Goldens rule!
    Yardman
    Zone 6 SE Ohio

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    That's NEAT!

    We love animals and currently, Hunter has a Chihuahua and 2 cats, and there are posters and calenders all over the house with dogs, cats and race car pictures...

    Hunter has a Nascar mouse that actually vibrates, but it doesn't work as well as expected so I had to take that one off his computer!

    I am somewhat out numbered since all the critters around here are male except for me...

    LAS!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  10. #10

    blue hibiscus

    is your blue a "blue satin"?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Actually, it's botanical name is 'Alyogyne huegellii'. It is a member of the same family as Hibiscus (Mallow), and it is commonly referred to as 'Blue Hibiscus'. It has hard seeds like the native hibiscus, but they are just a bit smaller, perhaps just a little bit larger than half the size.

    If you will notice, the leaves are very different, though. So far the few seeds that I have produced plants with the same type leaves, but it is too soon to tell about the color of the blooms yet.... It will be sometime in early spring, I am sure before I see any blooms from the first seed that I started.

    Do a google search on the botanical name, and you will find out more....

    It is just as pretty in person as you see in the picture. Nice, huh?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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