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Thread: Linda's Greenhouse Pictures

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Linda's Greenhouse Pictures

    Linda sent me pictures of her newly acquired lean to greenhouse that she bought for a bargain price. I will let her tell us more about it after I post the pictures here.













    This is very similar to what I have always wanted adjacent to the patio side of my home.

    NICE, Linda!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Southern Oregon
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    Linda's Greenhouse

    Thanks for posting these pictures Ann! To explain about how I was able to buy this at such an unbelievable price and state that these pictures are when it was set up at the previous owner's property, I'll do a copy and paste from emails I sent friends.

    Klaus (my husband) went to give an estimate for a job. He's started his own handyman business. This elderly couple bought a home with an enclosed pool. The enclosure was a Four Seasons, Systems 4 Greenhouse. Double paned, tempered glass, with the only openings being 3 sliding glass doors. With all that water in the pool and no windows to open, it got too hot and humid in there. They had the greenhouse taken down and a new unit put up where all the glass panels have sliding windows. Anyway, the man told Klaus that he wanted to sell the greenhouse for JUST $500!!! Just the materials cost around $12,000!!! The man said that it was around the size of 22' X 40'!!! All the walls and roof are double paned, tempered glass!!! I'VE GOT $350 LEFT FROM MY FATHER'S ESTATE that I will use and Klaus is going to barter with the man for work he needs him to do!!! ISN'T THAT FABULOUS?!!! This greenhouse needs a solid base to attach it to, so Klaus is going to put it on concrete pillars (since the ground isn't level where it will be built), which will be sunk about 2' in the ground. Klaus will build a wood base with decking all around the outside of the greenhouse! It will be built beside my 30' X 50' veggie garden, outside the fence. We've already transported all the framing and all glass panels. Still need to go get the angled windows for the end walls and sliding glass doors and screens. There's around 328 glass panels to wash! We have to replace all seals around the windows and frames and replace all sheet metal screws.

    Now all I have to figure out is how to get the money for the foundation! LOL Hubby figured that to cost about $2,000. In the meantime, I'm going to start my own little nursery with plants I have in my yard, in abundance, and plant cuttings and seeds I can gather from people I know. Wish me luck! Enjoy the pictures!
    Linda-So. Oregon, Zones 6/7

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Chester, Texas - very small country town
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    Thumbs up Very Nice pictures!!!!

    Linda -

    Boy you have a deal and a half there - that greenhouse is very nice !!

    Bet it will look just as great on your place - if not better -with that decking all around it !!!!

    Good luck in the business venture -
    goldeneagle = Beth S.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Southern Oregon
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    Thanks Beth! I'm REALLY excited about getting it up and functioning! I think it will take me quite a while before I will put ALL of it to good use! LOL The redwood or cedar decking will also have to be my flooring inside, so I will have to figure out what to put down to keep insects and varmits out, in case the varmits can chew holes right through the flooring! Something like wire mesh and insulation under the flooring. Have to consider the problem of keeping heat in and the cold out too! All in due time. I just may have to work on the floor for a while, until I can have work tables! LOL Perhaps more people on these message boards will have some suggestions for me. Sure hope so!
    Linda-So. Oregon, Zones 6/7

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Chester, Texas - very small country town
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    Them danged varmints!!!!!

    Linda -

    I know what you mean - about rodents eating thru floors - My Dad (rest his soul) years back he built a closed in porch for Mom - and had a crawlspace of only inches - so no way he could get under the flooring - but he tore it down and started over - several rats had chewed their way into that porch and scared the daylights out of Mom - so Dad got new lumber and then he treated it with a substance that repelled animals, rodent and Birds - he mixed this stuff and saturated the wood - then he rebuilt Moms porch - even better than before and he put solid wall around the base so nothing could get under it again - and then on the flooring he treated the inside wood with that mixture and then he put linoleum down so she would feel safer - and that porch was still standing last time I saw it - (about 2 yrs ago) -

    Now I was looking thru some of my supply catalogs and found some repellent - about the same as what Dad used - its called RO-PEL Animal, Rodent & Bird Repellent -- you might want to visit :

    www.groworganic.com

    they carry it - or you might even find something better - to me it is a little expensive but it sounds like it is worth it - 1 quart - cost $15.95 - but one gallon($49.95) treats 1000 - 4000 square feet depending on surface conditions and the porosity of items treated -

    it repels - birds, cats, dogs, mice, rats, deer, gophers, horses, rabbits, raccons, skunks and most other animals -
    (that is what the catalog says)

    But you can't use on certain crops - Now I have not tried this - but I really dont have a porch or deck or anything right now - that I could use it own - BUT - one of these days I will - when I can afford to build my own greenhouse -

    I hope this helped - and still maybe another member might have a better suggestion -

    Take Care -
    goldeneagle = Beth S.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Southern Oregon
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    I suppose I have to be careful of what I would saturate the wood with, in case it would give off fumes that would ruin any plants closed inside the greenhouse. I went to the site you suggeted that has the RO-PEL and read the information. Yes, it certainly is expensive when considering how much flooring there will be. However, I also noticed that you can use it on seeds and bulbs before planting them. Wonder how long the smell lasts, if I would have to treat bulbs every year. That's interesting, as gophers steal the most seeds and bulbs around here that I know of. Whole plants are pulled underground too! In fact, I'm pretty sure it was a gopher that pulled under my 2 year old beautiful Solomon's Seal plant I had in my front yard! Just left me a hole, leading down to tunnels under my garden! I was told at the nursery not to plant tulips in the ground because the gophers will get them. They need to be planted in patio planters, or enclosed in a fine wire mesh. Plastic baskets, like strawberries come in don't always stop them either! We have skunks here too! I've had a run-in with one in my veggie garden 4 years ago, at 11:45 pm! That little "stinker" sprayed both our dogs and myself, when I got in-between our german shepard and the skunk to keep our german shepard from attacking the skunk again, then trotted just as you please out of my veggie garden, down the inside of our backyard wire fence, hopped up onto our walkway beside the house and ducked under our gate! I don't have the nerve to kill the wildlife, so I've got to figure out some barriers to keep them away. Thanks for sharing your ideas with me!
    Linda-So. Oregon, Zones 6/7

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Chester, Texas - very small country town
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    skunk - yuck !!

    Linda -

    No problem for ideas - just glad you checked out the site - see I overlooked that about the seeds and bulbs - I noticed it about the special plants - so hey we both learned something today -

    Now about that skunk - hope you had plenty of tomato juice around - it helps with that smell an old friend told me about that after I had a run in with a stinking varmint - but never did again - I see them and I run the other way - ha ha

    Well good luck -

    Till next time -
    goldeneagle = Beth S.

  8. #8
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    Location
    Southern Oregon
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    Skunk spray tip....

    A tip from my German Mother-in-law that works! After pouring tomato juice on the dogs and rubbing it in real good, follow up with a good rinse, then lathering them down with any regular hair shampoo, rinse, then use any cheap hair conditioner or hair rinse and rinse for the last time. Worked Great!
    Linda-So. Oregon, Zones 6/7

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Chester, Texas - very small country town
    Posts
    30

    Thumbs up THANKS FOR THE TIP!!

    Linda -

    Hey thanks for that tip about using shampoo and creme rinse after the tomato treatment on dogs - my little mixed terrier (going on 13 of our years) so he is really an old man - but he thinks he is still master of the yard - ha ha

    He will chase anything that he dont recognise - opossums, raccoons, even some cats (not our own) he protects our kitties - he thinks he is the daddy - well at lease he adopted them - and they(the kitties) play with Beggar and he plays back until he gets tired and then he lets them know and then they lay down and sleep together - all of them are spoiled rotten (even him) but they are like kids to me -

    Anyway - take care
    goldeneagle = Beth S.

  10. #10

    Now THAT is a greenhouse

    If you get some carpet center cores, heavy cardboard or masonite forms, from a carpet store and use rebar inside them for strengthening, which are less than $1 each to cast your pillars, made of Sakcrete in a roller from Home Depot, on the weekends, you should be able to come in WAY UNDER $2000 for the concrete piers. You just have to cut them (the carpet rolls) to finished size, oil the inside with vegetable oil or dishwashing soap, and pour the concrete. Any carpet store would be pleased for you to haul them off.
    Marguerite, GrannyGarden
    www.kirbyville.net
    www.tex-la.net

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Southern Oregon
    Posts
    80

    Plans have changed for my foundation....

    Thanks for the compliments about my greenhouse! It certainly is a dream come true! Now if only I could get the money together to get the foundation built! After talking to a man here that deals in Four Season's greenhouses, we are changing our original plans of the cedar or redwood decking/flooring to block, like in the picture. Then I will have a gravel floor. Too much humidity in the greenhouse for that wood flooring to last very long! He told us that in only about 5 years, that wood flooring would be rotting and we would have to take the WHOLE greenhouse down to replace the flooring, then put it back up! Oh my word!!! He also told us that one of the cheapest ways to heat that greenhouse would be to snake copper tubing back and forth under that gravel floor and pump hot water through it. Now, to figure out where that hot water will come from and how it's going to be heated! May have to be a separate unit that sits outside the greenhouse, or even inside the greenhouse? Haven't thought about how that one will work yet. Our son-in-law, in New Mexico, is a stone and brick mason. He will come up here next spring to lay the block foundation for me! Then there's something like 328 panels of glass I have to wash!!! I can't wait until it's finished!!!

    Thanks for your ideas on making the cement pillars! That makes a lot of sense! This past summer my husband figured out how to make cement fence posts, using BIG plastic pipes, cutting them in half vertically, banding them together with metal strips, drilling holes down the verticle lines all the way through and inserting rebar strips through the holes. He made up cement platforms where the posts would be poured on top of them, where the posts would be sitting. Then he mixed up the cement, adding brown dye and pouring it into the verticle pipes! When he opened up those pipes, each half falling to the sides, the posts looked just like real wood fence posts! These plastic post forms will be able to be used numerous times! And these posts won't rot, like the ones previous owners used for fencing and only lasted 6 years, that we had to take out about 400' of the real wood posts this past summer! Also the three cross pieces from each 8'section! We're using those wood posts for firewood this year! After the cement posts were good and cured, he attached some kind of brackets to them so the cross pieces of fence could be attached to them! Very clever! That's right along the same lines of what you suggested on how to get the forms for free from carpet places, to use for the pillars under the foundation of my greenhouse! Great minds think alike!
    Linda-So. Oregon, Zones 6/7

  12. #12

    Thanks for your kind words

    Get yourself a brand new good quality hot water heater for about $130 and hook your copper tubing up to that and figure out how to recirculate it back for reheating, like putting together a garden fountain system, then just crank Betsy up. You can get the costs on it, by check to see what kind of energy your house hot water heater uses. Should be "for cheap", you might even be able to put a thermostat somewhere in the loop there. That's too scientific for my brain.

    The ideas for my concrete poles comes from being a life long crafter and as a divorcee for most of my adult life raising kids by myself, necessity was the mother of invention. We love junk in the first place and can turn it into some kind of "art" and figure out how to do a make do to fit almost any kind of situation. Do you remember McIver on TV? Well, we weren't quite that creative! But close.

    Tacky but proud, one year we were living in an apartment and didn't have a lot of room, plus we were too broke to buy a Christmas tree, so we picked up a couple armloads of trimmings from the Christmas tree lot and wired them to a broomstick attached to the wall. Although it was only half a Christmas tree, you obviously couldn't walk around it, it was "cute"! Looked like the real McCoy from the front.

    Later, don't get me started! LOL By the way my nephthytis plant you identified with your trusty book is the sygonium pelargonium or whatever. It is called the Arrowhead Vine. You've really learned how to work that book!
    Marguerite, GrannyGarden
    www.kirbyville.net
    www.tex-la.net

  13. #13
    Can someone finish the idea about the water heaters. This just might be the way for me to go with my two 6'x8' green houses. I have fround small 110 volt water heater for less than $100. Thinking I could do one in each house with copper pipes running back and forth under the benches. Have used electric heaters but they only last for about 1 1/2 seasons.
    Last edited by jimlang; 01-12-2003 at 09:20 AM.

  14. #14

    Hot Water Heater Idea!

    I'm the idea person, have to have my "technician crew" come through and do the nitty gritty! I also have 16 hours of electronics which qualifies me, in my case, to change a light bulb, too many years as a blonde! And a mom. LOL

    The outflow is simple, you just get the hot water heater going and turn on the faucet to which you would connect a fitting to secure one end of your copper tubing, it is the recirculating part that I couldn't figure out, you want to hook it up to come back in to your cold water feed, of course, but does it "need to be cold" going back in for proper operation of the hot water heat. There would be no limit on the amount of tubing that you can run every which way as far as I can see. Would you need a reservoir of some kind to cool off the water before it going back into the hot water heater? If so, an above ground container then could be releasing air heat to maintain your ambient air temperature in the greenhouse. If you are going to that, it would make sense that you would want to work in a timer or a thermostat somewhere there in the loop!

    I'm also trying to design a water saving system with about 5 - 55 gallon drums connected together and a small pump to uplift it to the intake drum. This would be a gravity system, but thinking about it this much is giving me a headache.
    You can tell you have to make some pretty good measurements and fine-tuning to get it working right, but I don't see why you would need a master's degree in hydraulics to figure it out.
    Can somebody check out some hot water heater mfg. sites, there may be a few clues there!
    Marguerite, GrannyGarden
    www.kirbyville.net
    www.tex-la.net

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Southern Oregon
    Posts
    80
    You've got some really great ideas here Marguerite! Wouldn't a separate water holding tank, that sits above ground work for the cooling off tank? There would be a thermostat in the hot water tank for the temp you want the hot water to be, then it's pumped through the copper tubing to heat the greenhouse, and from there it would be pumped into the holding tank to cool off a bit, before being pumped back into the hot water heater. No, let's see..... We still need a step in here for fresh water to be pumped into either the holding tank or the hot water heater. Perhaps fresh water should be pumped into the holding tank, which would be heated up a bit from the returning circulating hot water before going back into the hot water heater, which would save costs on having to heat up completely cold water if the fresh water was to be pumped directly into the hot water heater. Does that all make sense, or did I take you in circles, like the circulating water? LOL We get all our water from a well, so I was trying to figure out that circulating process, from well to house with our faucet that we have directly off a "T" piping that goes directly from the well, which I hook a hose to to water part of my gardens. Anyway, you wouldn't need a separate thermostat in the copper tubing, since you have it in the hot water heater! I'm sure this idea needs more fine tuning, but just some suggestions off the top of my head, which gives us more to think about! Perhaps by the time I'm ready to get this greenhouse put all together, we will have it all worked out!
    Last edited by Peoplepleaser; 01-13-2003 at 10:17 PM.
    Linda-So. Oregon, Zones 6/7

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