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Thread: Bananas

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Ky zone 6
    Posts
    66

    Bananas

    Hi
    I have a Banana plant that I need to know what to do with. I also have a friend in zone 4 that has the same question. I could keep it in the heated greenhouse but it is just to large. what is the best way to let it go dormant over the winter? What about the little ones that are just starting to grow around it? Remember I am in zone 6.

    Pat
    Log Cabin Pat

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Banana plants grow on rhizomes. The little plants can be dug up, potted and protected for next year, but cut the top of the leaves off to reduce transpiration and try to keep as many of the roots as you can.

    The mother plant will die after producing it's fruit. In ornamental bananas, these fruit are small, not edible and usually drop before ripening. The plant appears to come back every year, but what is actually happening is that the plants you see coming up are the new ones popping up (suckers).

    You can also propagate the rhizomes in the same manner as described in the rhizomes section of landspro with the exception that you should leave at least two eyes on each cutting. These rhizome cuttings can weigh about 8 lbs and are huge.

    I hope that helps. Let us know.

    Good Luck!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3

    Smile Nana's

    Hi,

    We have started growing Nana tress too. Got the suckers from my Father. I have done a little bit or research on them and found...That each plant will only produce 10 off spring. Now the information that I got from this wasn't very specific, and it did not say whether you could make more than that from the rhizomes. But I tend to think That you can make more this way.

    Also, a mistake, and you shouldn't do it! Let the Big tress continue to grow until the leaves turn brown from the cold and the frost. Then cut them off. My Father had cut the limbs off, and then peeled back the layers off of the stem, DON"T TO THAT! By doing this he caused his tree, to shrink. They next pring when it came back it was not as tall.

    In our climate zone 8 the trees will pick up right where they left off. Ifthey are 5 ft tall, then in the spring they will start growing at that same height. Make any sense? Just leave the STALK of the big plant alone, cut the leaves like Ann said, but that's it, and you will be okay. The smaller ones do also come back here, at the same height. But in your climate, you might want to protect them.

    We usually wrap plastic around them in the winter and they have always lived.

    They also love COW manuer! and fish guts!
    Happy Nana's
    Kathy in Ga.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Just to make sure that this is clear, only cut the leaves IF you are digging the plant up and potting it, otherwise let it die back naturally.

    Our neigbors have them, and they do nothing. They die to the ground, then pop up again next year.

    Good Luck to All! Hunter is home, Teacher Work Day, so I couldn't make as much progress as I would have liked. It is rainy, and he has interupted me often, so if I say something that doesn't sound right, please let me know, and I will fix it.

    Thanks!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #5

    Unhappy You said it good!

    Hey you are in the same climate as me. Your neighbor and I must have differnt varieties of Bananna trees.

    Ours don't die to the ground in winter, this is what they do.
    winter hits, the leaves turn brown, we cut them off, and leave the rest alone. Now they are just Stalks. Then in the spring, they start sprouting new leaves out of the center of the Stalk.

    No die down, must be a different variety huh???
    confused,
    Kathy in Ga.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Kathy,

    Zone 8 covers a lot of varying temperatures. My neighborhood is in a small microclimate that is colder than some other parts of the city.

    If you live near a river, ocean, gulf, bay, the temperatures tend to be a little higher. My Mom lives between an industrial ship channel, a small river and by the bay, and she has much milder temperatures than I do.

    The varieties that my neighbors have could be the same as yours. When I say they die back, I mean there is no green, but sometimes stubs will remain.

    We rarely get below 20 degrees, but it has been known to happen. Last year, we had many days of 24 degrees for hours at a time.

    We get a little snow about once in 10 years or so. It is not uncommon to get a hard freeze after the fruit trees have blossomed. Hey, Kathy, I remember being in Savannah on business a long time ago, and it snowed really pretty big flakes.

    Banana trees are considered to be herbaceous perennials, so it is okay if they die back. However, they are considered tropical and need to be protected in colder regions. Our ground does not freeze, so we are able to grow banana trees all year in the ground.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  7. #7

    Talking Daaah! I Understand NOW!

    Daaah! I said Daaah, I got it finally!
    Just kidding.

    Really, I do understand, you still have big stalks left there in the winter!

    The Savannah Snow? Would you be talking about the snow at Christmas in 1989? Man we had like 2-3 ft of it, and Accidents everywhere! What a nightmare man! Ya' know us southerners don't know how to drive in Snow. Well, I do now after living in Connecticut for 3 years!
    It was really pretty to see a White Christmas here. But all those new cars for Christmas. Weren't so new anymore!

    We've had a couple of snows since then but not accident causing.
    This truely is a great little place!

    Thanks for squaring me out on the Nana's
    Incase you are wondering, I always spell that word wrong (banannas) so it is easier for me to say Nana's!!!!! Hope you all laugh!
    Kathy in Ga.
    Last edited by Kathy in GA; 10-13-2001 at 09:11 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Tex .. near Dallas
    Posts
    280

    bananas

    Have heard that rotten bananas .. are great for Roses .... just "plant" skin and all near the bush/tree and watch them grow.

    Any truth to that?

    Jim

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
    Posts
    9,934
    Bananas are great for roses because they are high in potassium. I know people who have used them ripe, overripe or simply saved the peels and dried them. The latter would probably work better here because of the fire ant population.

    So, watch for those big bags of bananas that go on sale at the grocery store. They are also great for the compost pile.
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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