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Thread: Mandevilla Seed

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    8A East Texas
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    Mandevilla Seed

    This is my first year to grow mandevilla and it hasn't made any seed so far this summer. I'm thinking it may be due to the right pollinator not being here. Today I used an artist's paint brush to transfer pollen but am unsure really of what I am doing (I saw this on the discovery channel once when they were hanging from cliffs and pollinating some plants after their pollinating moth had gone extinct)...So...as you see, I could really use some advice!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Male/Female Plants

    Bobbie,

    You certainly picked a good question! This is my understanding from what I have read. Someone can correct me if I am wrong.

    First, let me explain some definitions relative to Male/Female Flowering plants.

    Dioecious

    There are some plants that are dioecious, meaning that some of them are male thus producing pollen and others are female and have the stigma/ovaries. This is also referred to as unisexual.. Examples are holly, kiwi, sago palm, spinach and asparagus. It is my understanding that the mandevilla is dioecious.

    To complicate matters even further, some dioecious plants are self-unfruitful which means they need a different variety to be fruitful. Apples, pears and plums are examples of these. I don't believe that is the case with the Mandevilla.

    Monoecious

    Some plants have both male and female flowers on each individual plant, and the pollen must come from a male flower to a female flower to produce fruit. Cucumbers are examples of monoecious plant.

    Perfect Flowers

    Some plants have what are known as perfect flower and self pollinated meaning the pollen from a flower can be used to pollinate the stigma on the same flower. Examples are the tomatoe and the Amaryllis.

    Even though a a specific variety of plant may have a perfect flower, some of them are self incompatible and will not produce fruit/seed if self pollinated.

    Again, it is my understanding that the Mandevilla is dioecious. For this reason, Mandevilla is usually propagated vegetatively, ie., via cuttings. Keep in mind that in most cases, but not all, a plant grown from a cutting will be a clone of the parent plant. Ie., if you take a cutting from a male plant, your rooted cutting will be a male plant.

    I have some pictures that I made for a friend that explains the reproductive anatomy of a flower which may be helpful to you, and I will post those later this morning.

    Mandevilla is easy to root from cuttings. Follow the instructions on the Vine Stem Cuttings page of Landspro. Cutting the outermost half of the leaves off or using Wilt Pruf to reduce transpiration (loss of moisture via the leaves) will help.

    Hope that Helps!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    8A East Texas
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    Thanks Ann. I had no earthly idea! I have two mandevilla's side-by side on my patio. Both white. I've never noticed hummingbirds or moths pollinating them, but that is not to say they don't. I like saving seed and with the beautiful white blooms you'd think there would be some I will start some from cuttings as you suggested and await your additional info.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Zone 9a - Gulf Coast
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    Reproductive Flower Anatomy

    Whooo! The white ones are pretty. All I have are the pink ones.

    Here are the links to the pages with the pictures of the parts of a flower. They aren't the best pictures in the world as I whipped these pages up real quickly for my friend, but hopefully you will get the idea.

    Passiflora Reproductive Flower Anatomy

    Okra Reproductive Flower Anatomy

    The Mandevilla flower anatomy is more similar to the okra, but is much smaller and the stigma is very tiny.

    Hope that helps!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Correction to Reply

    For those of you who have already read my first reply to this thread, please read it again. I have made a correction and added some information to it.

    I visited our local Cooperative Extension office, and I fortunate enough to discuss this issue with the instructor for our Master Gardener Propagation Class. He clarified some issues for me and answered some questions on this topic. I still have much to learn, and I am trying to find a good reference book or source, if anyone knows of one, that will list the 'gender' of specific varieties of plants. He gave me the name of 'THE' person to contact at Auburn University who is in charge of propagation, but it may take some time for this person to return my phone call. There is no doubt in my mind that he is a busy man.

    In the meantime, Enjoy!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


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