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Thread: Crepe Myrtle Seed Pods and Seeds - Images

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Crepe Myrtle Seed Pods and Seeds - Images

    It is that time of the year when Crepe Myrtle seeds are starting to ripen. I have taken some pictures to assist in identifying the ripe seed pods.

    Click below:

    http://www.landspro.com/page1020.htm
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  2. #2

    Wink One of them.

    Hi, I'm back!
    Missed you all!

    Thanks for the great pics. One of my crepes is seeding right now and they are cracked open not yet falling to the ground. I don't want to collect the seeds and plant them, what can I do to elivate so of the seed work, in order to get them to grow? Should I just throw them on the ground and water, and hope that they sprout?

    Maybe you could talk me into planting the seeds from them, but i was really looking for any easy way this time. And how long does it take for the Crepe Myrtles to get 1 foot tall when planted from seed?
    Any estimates would be helpful.
    Thanks
    Kathy in Ga.

  3. #3
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    My Method

    Kathy,

    I nearly always start seeds in tray cell packs, then transplant them to bigger pots. In the case of the Rose of Sharon, I go directly from a cell to a one gallon pot. I use the cells during the winter because they are small and do not take much room, but in the spring, the larger plants start to grow really fast, so I transplant them to a one gallon pot.

    They will grow about 1 foot the first year. After that, they will not grow as fast unless you plant them in a bigger pot or in the ground.

    If you have a controlled garden area, by that I mean no weeds or other seedlings, you can start them in the ground. Just make sure that you keep the soil moist and not too wet or too dry.

    Keep in mind that I am not a big fertilizer, they may grow faster for you if you fertilize them according to their needs.

    And, yes, I haven't posted that thread on fertilizer yet. This week has been a rather hectic one, but I plan on doing that just as soon as I can. I just didn't want all of you to miss out on saving those seed.

    Enjoy!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  4. #4
    Join Date
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    First, a testimonial to Search Function .. Yay Search Function. I wanted to know how to identify crepe myrtle seeds and voila -pictures and all !
    *********************
    So, the next question is this...plant them now in cell paks or Ann, did you mean wait 'til Spring to sow outdoors ?
    Also, is it OK to open brown pods that haven't opened on their own and harvest the seeds or is that a non-no.
    Do they need cold treatment ?
    How deep are the seeds planted ?
    *********************
    Also, for those of you who do not know where to get crepe myrtle seeds, might I share the opportune experience I had this morning. While strolling thru the Wal-mart garden center I noticed crepe myrtles with seeds pods..need I say more
    "If I keep a green bough in my heart, a singing bird will come"




  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    northern virginia
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    Although this thread is two years old, I am still interested in the reply. I have the pods, when should I plant the seeds? Now ??
    thanks again Ann
    Linda
    Linda

  6. #6
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    Linda,

    If it were me, even here, I would wait until spring unless you have a place to protect them over winter and still have plenty of light.

    They grow very fast and should be big enough to stay outside next year.

    Are you growing these to sale or to plant in your garden?
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    northern virginia
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    Okay, do they need to reside in the refridgerator for the winter or in a ziplock baggie on the shelf?
    I am a hobby gardener, Ann, I give away my excesses, altho I have kept all 27 new rose bushes I started, and may also keep the rose seedlings I started if they survive the winter in my garage.
    Mainly, I am still trying to clone the neighbor's maple tree. My summer air-layering didn't work (it did on the azaleas, so I am doing it right some places), and the seedlings I pulled from under the tree were all sweet gum seedlings except for perhaps 4, so I tossed (it killed me) the sweet gums and repotted the 4 possible maple seedlings. Here's hoping they might survive and grow.
    Next I will try hardwood cuttings of the maple and see if I can convince them to grow in the spring......One way or the other, I am going to recreate that maple tree!!
    Thanks, Linda
    Linda

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Linda,

    I have never refrigerated them, and they germinate just fine the next spring. In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if they last longer than that at room temperatures.

    I also wouldn't be surprised if they would be okay in the refrigerator. You might try some both ways and let us know.

    The azaleas that we grow around here are easy to propagate from cuttings. Some, however, are not as easy - like native azaleas and other deciduous azaleas.

    By maple, do you mean the Red Japanese Maple? That one is really hard to propagate from cuttings. Even the experts have a hard time with it. Most are grafted or grown from seeds. Not all seeds will be exactly like the parents.

    Sounds like you are having FUN!
    Ann B.
    Zone 9a
    Gulf Coast


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    northern virginia
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    366
    No, my neighbor haS this sugar maple that is probably over 50 feet tall, and occasionally produces seeds, but I havent' had any success in germinating the seeds, air layering the branches or capturing volunteer seedlings. They want clones from it and so do I but I have been at this for 3 years now.........I am persistent.
    I bought some stronger hormone rooting liquid from Charley's Garden Supplies in WA, and soon I will try to do some hardwood cuttings from this tree once it gets good and cold. I also bought some air layering kits from them and will give them a try next spring! One way or another, I will even try grafting if I can figure out when to try it!
    I have the information from your website and from freeplants.com and from the National Forestry Service website. Grafting takes practice, so I guess I will get some next spring. I have 4 sweet gum seedlings I intend to try to graft a branch from this tree onto.
    HOpe something works, I am not getting any younger!!
    Think I will gather some more crepe myrtle seed pods and try ithem various ways so we will have a definite answer about when to germinate crepe myrtle seeds.
    Linda
    Linda

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    598
    Linda
    One explanation for your failure with Maple seeds is that a large percentage of them are not viable. The next time it produces seeds, collect some and split them. I think you will find that many, if not all, are hollow. If you find that there are some good ones (a seed inside the little capsule) then just count how many out of 10 were good, and count on that percentage of seedlings. The Dirr book says the seeds should be stratified at 41 degrees for 60-90 days, which means that seeds collected in Oct, would be ready to plant in Jan. Many times in nature, the seeds will be dormant for several months on the forest floor, so I would guess that planting later would do just as well.

    Cuttings of the sugar maple are also difficult, but possible. New growth cuttings taken in June and treated with 1000 ppm IBA talc rooted at around 50% for the Dirr research. I suspect that your odds will improve if you are able to remove most of the leaves, and keep the rest moist in a high humidity environment.

    As for the Crepe myrtles, I have propagated them many times from cuttings in spring, summer and winter with and without rooting hormone. The odds are better with 1000 ppm IBA. The thing about cuttings is, you get exactly what you expect plus, the cutting taken from a mature plant, is also ‘mature’, and will bloom much sooner than seedlings.

    Seeds begin to fall here in the middle of Oct, and will continue all thru the winter. I never do see any seedlings and assume the birds eat them. Seeds that hang on until Jan or Feb have had enough cold stratification to cause them to sprout. Plant them on top of moist soil, and sprinkle a light covering of vermiculite to cover them. Transfer the young seedlings to 1 gal pots as soon as you can handle them.
    Tom W
    Aching Back Farm

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    northern virginia
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    Tom,
    Based on your comments, I put some crape myrtle (crepe myrtle) seeds in a paper towel, in a ziplock baggie and set it on the window sill. I sent off to California and then Germany. That took up 3 weeks more or less. Last night I opened up the paper towel, and 1 had germinated!!. I put it in a pot and put saran wrap over it and have it at a north-facing window for light. I am keeping the others in the moist paper towel, in case a few more might germinate (it is pretty cool next to the window these days). I am interested to see what will happen next??

    The three successful crepe myrtle cuttings I did in August don't look so great right now. I have them in pots in the garage in light but no additional heat. All the leaves have died off, and I don't know if they have died or gone dormant. I am keeping the soil just moist on occasion. (Like every 3 weeks I water a little) They rooted but didn't really do any additional growing this fall, so I think I might have started them too late in the season.

    I bought some stronger rooting hormone from Charley's Gardening supply in ?Washington, but I think it is a liquid form and I will need to read up on making up a dilution. I also bought a couple of air-layering kits from them to try out. My last attempt at air layering the maple tree brought me scarred areas on the branches, but no roots. I am going to do some hardwood cuttings on Friday and bury them upside down in the garden as the instructions show and try to root them out in the spring.
    Thank you for your advice.
    Linda
    Last edited by lbfoss; 12-12-2005 at 09:26 AM.
    Linda

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    SE PA, zone 6b
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    You can get Dip n Grow from www.amleo.com. It is a liquid with a high rooting success. One can follow directions for diluting it for various types plants.

    You can get a lot of other neat things at A.M. Leonard. It is much nearer to VA therefore less shipping cost.
    Sandi
    SE PA, zone 6b

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    northern virginia
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    And now for a summary of my summer experimentations.
    1. Have 4 seedling maple trees of the correct parentage that seem to be very slow growing but alive. I culled them out from the over 20 volunteers I had dug out from under that Maple tree last spring. Not a seed germinated after stratification. The hardwood cuttings didn't do a thing and the air layering didn't work either..............hmmm
    2. The crape myrtle seeds germinated fastest (I am hoping that is a word) in a moist paper towel, in a ziplock baggie on a north facing window started 1 FEB. I transplanted every single seed that germintated into 6 paks with miracle grow potting soil, put them back in baggies and set them in south windows with very filtered sunlight, but heating pads on low under them during the day(on timers). I moved about 40 seedlings outside this spring. One I direct planted with about 4 true leaves on it and it is now 4' tall, nicely branched but didn't bloom. The rest I repotted into 1/2 gallon milk jugs with holes in the bottom. When they started putting out roots thru the holes, I repotted, gave away or planted them. None have bloomed this season, and based on the variety of leaf types, I am betting most will not resemble their parent, but who cares. Those not planted immediately grew as their containers allowed until I moved them into the ground. Most are about 18-24" tall with many side branches and should make nice bushes (which is what I am after).
    3. The three crape myrtle cuttings I took last September wintered successfully in my garage, and are about 2 1/2 -3' tall. I transplanted them to bigger pots in the spring and then planted them by 1 SEP. I have pruned them to come as trees but each only has a main trunk at this time and they did not bloom but they do look very happy.
    4. The few cuttings I did this spring have rooted and branched but have not bloomed and are about 10" tall.

    So for me it was a great summer, even though I wasn't home for most of it, my kind neighbors watered occasionally and everything survived! I have tons of seeds coming from the CMs that did bloom, so let me know if you want to try this out!!

    Linda
    Linda

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